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Why are pop 'musicians' so famous and rich, and classical musicians not? (Read 11697 times)

Offline gyzzzmo

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Yup.

Eh, there's the rub.  Pianists are notoriously bad at this, and at keeping a beat steady enough the orchestra can follow.  (I've never played piano with an orchestra - I have played in an orchestra accompanying a piano)

The problem is that pianists have an orchestra themselves: the piano. The people in the orchestra have to follow the conductor, but the conductor and pianists relation are more like 'playing together'.
1+1=11

Offline timothy42b

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The problem is that pianists have an orchestra themselves: the piano. The people in the orchestra have to follow the conductor, but the conductor and pianists relation are more like 'playing together'.

I agree, but there's a skill factor involved.  The people in the orchestra practice playing with each other and following the conductor every day.  The pianist practices playing with the conductor once a year.  (slight exaggeration - but sometimes it is never!)
Tim

Offline gyzzzmo

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I agree, but there's a skill factor involved.  The people in the orchestra practice playing with each other and following the conductor every day.  The pianist practices playing with the conductor once a year.  (slight exaggeration - but sometimes it is never!)

Ofcourse, but i was only pointing out that members of the orchestra usually expect the pianist to be a member of their orchestra and behave like a member, while he actually isnt - and shouldnt.

This is also a reason why some conductors cant properly guide pianoconcerts and why some pianists can only play with very good and versatile orchestra's. There's skill for anything i guess ;)
1+1=11

Offline timothy42b

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Ofcourse, but i was only pointing out that members of the orchestra usually expect the pianist to be a member of their orchestra and behave like a member, while he actually isnt - and shouldnt.


I usually expect them to be able to count to 4.  But...................
Tim

Offline oxy60

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I usually expect them to be able to count to 4.  But...................

My sense of rhythm and exact meter was ruined during years of being a church organist pulling congregations up to speed. These days I switch the metronome on every classical piece I can.

For some reason when I play bass, locking in with the drums and the band is no problem. Maybe it's because the sound is directly connected to when I pluck the string rather than through some mechanical/electrical connection.

One famous pianist wrote about how difficult it was to keep two grand pianos together facing each other.

In an orchestra situation the conductor keeps the orchestra with what he hears from the piano, not what he sees.
"In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks."  John Muir  (We all need to get out more.)

Offline timothy42b

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My sense of rhythm and exact meter was ruined during years of being a church organist pulling congregations up to speed. These days I switch the metronome on every classical piece I can.

 

That has been my theory too.  You press a key, after a while air fills a pipe, after a bit longer sound fills the church, then finally it echoes back to your ears.  The delay is too long for any human nervous system to stay synchronized. 
Tim

Offline gyzzzmo

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That has been my theory too.  You press a key, after a while air fills a pipe, after a bit longer sound fills the church, then finally it echoes back to your ears.  The delay is too long for any human nervous system to stay synchronized. 

Especially if the average listener is 70+
1+1=11