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getting faster (Read 1770 times)

Offline nick

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getting faster
« on: January 19, 2014, 09:43:13 PM »
Wonder what others opinion is on this theory of mine. When one has the correct technique to play, let's say a very good method of producing sound, would it makes sense that one does not get faster by practicing a little faster over time, as that would produce tension and tension and speed don't mix well. That speed is produced rather by strength developed with the SMALL muscles of the hand, very relaxed, slowly over time. As a result, once enough of this practice is done, the speed is there!  I notice when I try and go little faster with all visual and aural elements being observed, tension is there. But going much slower 0 tension. Only other option I see is going so slightly faster where it feels just like going slower and staying there awhile, Then little more with same 0 tension feeling. I like the former as I feel a lot of work going on even going very slowly.

nick

Offline nyiregyhazi

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Re: getting faster
«Reply #1 on: January 20, 2014, 02:48:00 AM »
Wonder what others opinion is on this theory of mine. When one has the correct technique to play, let's say a very good method of producing sound, would it makes sense that one does not get faster by practicing a little faster over time, as that would produce tension and tension and speed don't mix well. That speed is produced rather by strength developed with the SMALL muscles of the hand, very relaxed, slowly over time. As a result, once enough of this practice is done, the speed is there!  I notice when I try and go little faster with all visual and aural elements being observed, tension is there. But going much slower 0 tension. Only other option I see is going so slightly faster where it feels just like going slower and staying there awhile, Then little more with same 0 tension feeling. I like the former as I feel a lot of work going on even going very slowly.

nick

I don't follow your point sorry. Can you clarify exactly what you mean? What you go on to say seems to contradict what you started out.

Regarding these issues, subjective perceptions cannot be assumed as objective reality. The reason many pianists and teachers alternate almost immediately between slow and fast executions (for small chunks) is that "zero" tension in slow tempo is often more a case of tension-release over and over (and often wildly excessive and dysfunctional in both states). When you go slow, the limits of this will be exposed and you are forced to converge on something that is actually based on continuous freedom rather than alternation between different faults.

If the little fast bursts don't work, you go straight back to slow and precise and keep alternating- until you have a single quality of movement that works in both tempos. It's both about slow technique being improved in comparison to faster executions and faster executions improving from experience of slower and very precise ones. In the end there is minimal difference in the basic quality- in that both should feature fluid sideways arm movements with no separate downward arm pressures into individual notes.

Offline nick

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Re: getting faster
«Reply #2 on: January 20, 2014, 09:57:57 PM »
I don't follow your point sorry. Can you clarify exactly what you mean? What you go on to say seems to contradict what you started out.

Regarding these issues, subjective perceptions cannot be assumed as objective reality. The reason many pianists and teachers alternate almost immediately between slow and fast executions (for small chunks) is that "zero" tension in slow tempo is often more a case of tension-release over and over (and often wildly excessive and dysfunctional in both states). When you go slow, the limits of this will be exposed and you are forced to converge on something that is actually based on continuous freedom rather than alternation between different faults.

If the little fast bursts don't work, you go straight back to slow and precise and keep alternating- until you have a single quality of movement that works in both tempos. It's both about slow technique being improved in comparison to faster executions and faster executions improving from experience of slower and very precise ones. In the end there is minimal difference in the basic quality- in that both should feature fluid sideways arm movements with no separate downward arm pressures into individual notes.

Sure. I think the correct way is once the right feeling, touch is observed, both visually and aurally, it is best to just stay with it, repeat rather than gradually playing faster. My last statements were wondering if there is another possibility that might be correct to not allow tension, and that would be to only go very slightly faster where it feels identical to the slower speed with regard to no tension. Wondered what others think about this?

You are saying one needs both, back and forth?

update: after a few days of staying at the slower speed, I think gradually getting faster is the way. One gets accustomed to the slower speed, and faster is a shock. Moving up gradually appears correct, as in just a short practice session a speed that seemed difficult is much easier. Like if you are going 80 mph on hwy, then go 60, the latter seems slow. But going 35 for awhile, then 60 seems pretty fast. 

Nick