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Teacher as a Sensei? (Read 2262 times)

Offline Mayla

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Teacher as a Sensei?
« on: March 22, 2014, 04:13:35 PM »
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"The greatest thing in this world is not so much where we are, but in what direction we are moving"  ~Oliver Wendell Holmes

Offline kevin69

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Re: Teacher as a Sensei?
«Reply #1 on: March 24, 2014, 10:30:27 AM »
I think this sort of apprenticeship it no longer that common today (in europe at least).
However, in academia i think it still exists between a PhD student and their supervisor.
For me an important part of this is that while you start off in a student/teacher relationship the end goal is to be working as equals, and that this should be acheived within a fairly strict timeframe too.


Offline Bob

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Re: Teacher as a Sensei?
«Reply #2 on: March 24, 2014, 11:00:07 AM »
Master-apprentice I'd agree.  Except I don't think the teacher can know all that.  I wouldn't trust them to. 

"Teacher as guide" is what I'd go with.  Or just 'person as guide.'  You can pick things up from someone even if they're not a teacher. 
Favorite new teacher quote -- "You found the only possible wrong answer."

Offline faulty_damper

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Re: Teacher as a Sensei?
«Reply #3 on: March 25, 2014, 06:58:41 AM »
When I was in music school, when the teacher was away on tour during the summers, he would have his students house sit.  They would hang out at his place, play on his Steinway, drink his wine, eat his cheese, and smoke pot.  I don't think this is the kind of student-teacher relationship you're referring to.  ;D

Anyway, what you refer to is a master-disciple relationship, not the Western student-teacher relationship, which is different.  A master is someone who has complete command of his field of expertise while a teacher rarely has such command or knowledge.  A disciple will learn everything  from his/her master and creativity is strongly discouraged.  A student is expected to learn on his/her own and figure things out for him/herself.  There will only be a couple of disciples per master but there can be thousands of students per teacher.  A disciple must carry and pass on the tradition whereas a student can do whatever s/he chooses including forget everything s/he learned.

Offline pianoslav

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Re: Teacher as a Sensei?
«Reply #4 on: March 25, 2014, 05:18:58 PM »
I agree with you. You can observe this teaching model in some of the great recent pianists. For example, Sviatoslav Richter had an ongoing, lifelong relationship and mentorship from Heinrich Neuhaus. Neuhaus speaks about this in his book, The Art of Piano Playing. Also, Evgeny Kissin had a pretty close relationship with his teacher Anna Kantor, whom he continued to learn from long after he was world famous, and would travel with him to his concerts. I'm sure that there are more, less-famous examples of this as well (those pianists whose parents play piano fairly well and become musical mentors for them, until their children outgrow their level).

I'm not saying this is the only model of student-teacher relationship, because there are many great pianists who went to conservatory, where they took classes from many different teachers and never really became close with them. However, this model still gives results like it did in hundreds of years ago.

Offline Mayla

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Re: Teacher as a Sensei?
«Reply #5 on: March 31, 2014, 05:06:16 PM »
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"The greatest thing in this world is not so much where we are, but in what direction we are moving"  ~Oliver Wendell Holmes

Offline Mayla

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Re: Teacher as a Sensei?
«Reply #6 on: March 31, 2014, 07:01:12 PM »
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"The greatest thing in this world is not so much where we are, but in what direction we are moving"  ~Oliver Wendell Holmes