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Metronome in lessons and practice (Read 3923 times)

Offline kateb

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Metronome in lessons and practice
« on: January 25, 2002, 03:40:30 AM »
Any tips for teaching students who just can't seem to match up with the metronome? I've had limited success with working on one measure at a time with the metronome.  I have also asked that they 1. close their eyes and listen to nothing but the metronome, then 2. start tapping the piano along with the metronome, then 3. open their eyes and play with the metronome.

These tactics do not always work, however. This is mostly a problem when we get to eighth notes with the metronome clicking on the quarter note. But some have problems even with the quarter notes.

Thanks in advance...

Offline louellen

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Re: Metronome in lessons and practice
«Reply #1 on: February 25, 2002, 01:19:23 AM »
Put the metronome in the back of your closet until you need it to check a tempo.  

What a child hears in a metronome is 1 1 1 1 1 1 , not 123, 123, 123, etc.  Try handing your student a couple of sticks to tap the beat to recorded music.  Make sure there is some body movement to associate with the rhythm.  

The best way for children to learn rhythm is to hear it, and that includes their new songs.  Make a tape or get a CD of their music, so they can get familiar with it before trying to play it themselves.

And then enjoy!

Offline stokes

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Re: Metronome in lessons and practice
«Reply #2 on: March 16, 2002, 02:40:55 AM »
The best way to get a child to understand rhythms is to make the child count out loud. Do never count for the child, but if necessary, count with the child. This will make the child realize pulse and rhytm. If you count for the child s/he will hear your counting as metronome beats and not listen to 1234, 1234 or whatever. The student does not have to think. Make the student exaggerate the first beats when counting. Good luck!

Offline ludwig

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Re: Metronome in lessons and practice
«Reply #3 on: April 28, 2002, 05:07:27 AM »

You could always play with them, if that is possible. Imitation sometimes could get them to think about how this rhythm should be. Also encourage them to play duets with other students, or play in groups such as an ensemble. This will help them to co operate with other people thus getting a general idea of metre. Letting them listen as louellen said is a good idea, so is letting them working out what sounds good and not by letting them do the counting, such as Stokes mentioned. Basically, let them work it through with your guidance from time to time.

and about metronomes in lessons: Crucial...:)
"Classical music snobs are some of the snobbiest snobs of all. Often their snobbery masquerades as helpfulnes... unaware that they are making you feel small in order to make themselves feel big..."ÜÜÜ

Offline stokes

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Re: Metronome in lessons and practice
«Reply #4 on: May 03, 2002, 01:22:57 PM »
Letting students play with others is a good idea, but it is impossible if they cannot match up with rythm. They have to understand rhythms first. Playing with others will not make the student understand rhythms, but could be good as reinforcement when they do. Therefore counting must be done first.

Offline psteinberg

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Re: Metronome in lessons and practice
«Reply #5 on: May 11, 2002, 07:30:54 AM »
I agree that students should FEEL the rhythm first, and that should involve the student's body.It's useless to try to make the student hear those metronome ticks if s/he doesn't have a strong feeling of pulse when asked to tap and say "quarter" for quarter notes. For some students, it helps if they swing their body, or walk or tap their foot. Something PHYSICAL has to be done. After this, the metronome could be introduced when playing a scale, as the student still says aloud "quarter" (and later "two-eights"). Believe me. This works! After all this, my student finally has a steady pulse and understands rhythm much better, even when playing Bach's sinfonias.

Offline IvoryTickler

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Re: Metronome in lessons and practice
«Reply #6 on: May 26, 2002, 05:55:35 AM »
I've had great success with clapping the beat and counting out the rhythm at the same time.  At first you have to do it with the student, but once they realize how it fits together, they can do it alone.  I bring out the metronome while the student is still a beginner - on a piece he or she knows well - to break them in easily!   ;D