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Topic: Truplets against dotted (a false problem?)  (Read 1280 times)

Offline Daniel_piano

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Truplets against dotted (a false problem?)
on: November 28, 2004, 01:25:24 PM
This bar confused me a bit
Maybe it's a false problem and I just have to use logic but in this case where there's dotted note against a truplet does the last note of the second beat corresponds to the last note of the second truplets or should I distribute the quaver in a different way against the truplet?
It may seem a stupid question for my level but I've never encountered something similar before...
If only my theory book was a bit more practical and detailed...



Thanks a lot
Daniel
"Sometimes I lie awake at night and ask "Why me?" Then a voice answers "Nothing personal, your name just happened to come up.""

Offline xvimbi

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Re: Truplets against dotted (a false problem?)
Reply #1 on: November 28, 2004, 01:40:56 PM
First of all, you have invented a great new word: I like "truplet". It combines both aspects of this feature. :D

In any case, I think you can safely consider the two staves to be independent of each other. This means, each triplet occupies one beat, no matter what is going on in the other staff.

Offline pianiststrongbad

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Re: Truplets against dotted (a false problem?)
Reply #2 on: November 28, 2004, 04:26:01 PM
This is a case of two against three.  The second note (D) of your left hand falls BETWEEN the 5th and 6th note in the right hand (D and E).

Offline xvimbi

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Re: Truplets against dotted (a false problem?)
Reply #3 on: November 28, 2004, 04:40:45 PM
This is a case of two against three.  The second note (D) of your left hand falls BETWEEN the 5th and 6th note in the right hand (D and E).
Note that the editor indicated this by aligning the notes in exactly this way.
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