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Gabriel Fauré’s Piano Music

Gabriel Fauré is considered one of the most influential and gifted French composers of the late romantic and early 20th century period. His early compositions, influenced by Chopin and his teacher Saint-Saënt, are of very romantic character while he later developed a more personal and harmonically complex musical style. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Comprehensive book on notation, theory, etc. for amateurs?  (Read 1391 times)
tom_
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« on: November 18, 2014, 12:25:26 AM »

Hi everyone, I apologize in advance as this is usually the type of thing that is easy to find, but I haven't been able to, so maybe I'm just missing something.
I am looking for some sort of definitive book/textbook or series on music notation and theory suitable for a beginner, I would prefer something I can read through and reference rather than the more common workbook style.
Does anyone have some recommendations?
Thanks!!

More info:
I've studied piano for several years as a teenager and I'm getting back into it now (20). I never really practiced much and I also never did any theory (played scales, broken chords, etc. but no explanation behind them). I really feel lacking in this area, sometimes I even encounter things in music notation that I realize I don't know about. (ie. I'm pretty sure a trill is always supposed to be a semitone above the written note, but I have no clue what the formal definition is or what the different symbols mean. Is an arpeggiated chord (with the squiggly line) supposed to be held after it's played - or should the roll be stretched out to the appropriate time? etc.) Additionally I am interested in both mathematics and composition so I feel that some deeper music theory (chord progressions, explanation of key signatures, etc.) would be something I could really appreciate.

If there are any good books on basic piano technique, composition, etc. I would like to hear your recommendations as well!
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chopinlover01
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« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2014, 12:38:46 AM »

Music theory for Dummies. Great read, and very cheap. That book also has a references section in it where it gives you other books to read. I got mine around $10 USD new, and have never regretted it.
Also, Music Composition for dummies is worth at least a rent, if not a buy from your local bookstore.
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theholygideons
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« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2014, 02:33:28 AM »

Theory of harmony by Arnold schoenberg. Who cares about the squiggly stuff, you can figure that out from recordings.
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