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Topic: Etude Op. 10 No. 8 in F major by Chopin  (Read 1825 times)

Offline Remon

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Etude Op. 10 No. 8 in F major by Chopin
on: March 15, 2003, 06:40:54 PM
Hey everybody!

I started with this Chopin-etude about two weeks ago, and I would like to hear any suggestions/opinions about this piece! :D
For example, in how much time have you managed to conquer this piece? Which part/technical aspect is the most difficult? What is the most important to keep in mind while practising?

Thanks a lot!

Remon

Offline tosca1

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Re: Etude Op. 10 No. 8 in F major by Chopin
Reply #1 on: March 15, 2003, 07:59:36 PM
Dear Remon,
The main technical challenge in playing this study is the passing under of the thumb and achieving smoothness of tone in the arpeggio figures. As preparation for this, you should re-visit the elementary principles of the passing under of the thumb in scales and arpeggios.
It is important to remember that the thumb movement must be prepared and as most of the piece features this difficulty in the right hand you should focus on the ascending arpeggios where the execution of the thumb under is more difficult.
Of course a certain amount of wrist flexion is necessary but as in good scale and arpeggio playing you must avoid jerking the wrist which will result in a bumpy sound.
There are too other technical difficulties such as the constantly changing hand position for the 4 note semi-quaver groups in the middle section.  Again they must be absolutely smooth and even.
I would say you should give yourself 6 months to learn this piece and then like good wine, rest it for a while before fully savouring its delights.
Murray Perahia does a lovely job of this study in his recent recording of the Chopin Etudes.
Regards,
Robert.

Offline trunks

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Re: Etude Op. 10 No. 8 in F major by Chopin
Reply #2 on: April 07, 2004, 09:23:49 AM
Oh this F major Etude - I just love it, with all the liveliness of a playful kid. It's fun inspiring. I have the picture of a mouse or a guinea-pig dashing forward and backward on the keyboard. :D

The double-hand fingerwork passage (4-note semiquaver passages as mentioned by Robert  immediately above) requires lots of relaxation and slow practice. Never forget to practise on single hands before ever attempting both hands.
Peter (Hong Kong)
part-time piano tutor
amateur classical concert pianist

Offline tosca1

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Re: Etude Op. 10 No. 8 in F major by Chopin
Reply #3 on: April 07, 2004, 11:22:54 AM
It is a very refreshing piece to listen to and to play. It has quasi "impressionistic" effects with its ascending and descending brushstrokes of sound colours.  I love it and must look at it again.
Regards,
Robert.

Shagdac

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Re: Etude Op. 10 No. 8 in F major by Chopin
Reply #4 on: April 09, 2004, 01:04:58 AM
I enjoyed this piece, though it's been awhile it certainly deserves re-visiting! If I remember correctly, I had trouble remembering to play the short appoggiaturas very quickly, ON the beat and the first of two small notes (such as in meas. 5) ON the beat. Not sure why that gave my trouble, but it did. Hope you enjoy this piece!

shag :)
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