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Teaching with no lesson book (Read 2167 times)

Offline devron

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Teaching with no lesson book
« on: April 27, 2015, 12:32:11 PM »
Hey good morning everyone, I was seeking some assistance on finding lower level music for students.  I don't want to hear lesson book music all day, I want to teach kids to enjoy and love classical music along with jazz.  The difficulty I am presented with is that jazz has tough rhythms but once rhythm is taken care of and scales are taught there isn't much left to do but talk about how we can interpret music.

So my question is is there a book of lower level, concentrated LH music that can get kids reading in bass clef more often then treble. I have a group of about 20 jazz tunes that are excellent for rhythms and reading practice, I have been playing them since I was a kid.  My reference is for the younger age group from 4-12, what music can I give to someone as there 1,2,3,4 works on the piano to bridge the gap to Classical music. 

All of my students will know all 12 scales at least in 1,2 octaves depending on age they will be played e.h.a. Or b.t.h. and it will be there choice if they want to take them to 4 octaves.  I use scales as practice for reading review but it is not enough notes to make music seem less intimidating.  I have album for the young, first lessons in bach, kabeleski, I want more variety and easier music but LH concentrated with no treble. I like using Hanon as reading practice and following music but That only goes so far.

Any suggestions?

Offline quantum

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Re: Teaching with no lesson book
«Reply #1 on: April 28, 2015, 02:57:59 AM »
I know several teachers that have written their own texts for use in their studios or university courses.  It will allow the teacher to have their desired curriculum and presentation, especially useful when available texts are difficult to fit with the intended course of study.  You can even publish it if you so desire. 
Made a Liszt. Need new Handel's for Soler panel & Alkan foil. Will Faure Stein on the way to pick up Mendels' sohn. Josquin get Wolfgangs Schu with Clara. Gone Chopin, I'll be Bach

Offline cassy11

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Re: Teaching with no lesson book
«Reply #2 on: September 28, 2015, 05:36:39 AM »
I think reading a book should be useful for beginners, just to know how it's done. If you are good at playing the piano, I am sure you could develop your own course. By the way, I've also noticed that teacher's with their own curriculum are usually better and make more money ;)

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Offline devron

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Re: Teaching with no lesson book
«Reply #3 on: September 28, 2015, 01:14:12 PM »
I tried it for a long time, kids like pictures and stickers when it comes down to it. I lost students trying to teach without a book,I don't have enough experience yet to be able to get it done. I'm only 24 and have been teacher for about a year or so maybe in a while, any advice on encouraging students I was also told I was to tough of a teacher?

I start in john Thompson easiest piano course then it is right into book 2 of Alfred's and continue till they can play anything within reason. I still teach technique by hand and theory by word of mouth because the average kid doesn't need to have any theoretical knowledge I acquired mine the same way, to look at that music and think about what was being said.

Offline nikkitytom

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Re: Teaching with no lesson book
«Reply #4 on: September 28, 2015, 09:32:42 PM »
Devron   ... your post resonates with me.  About three years ago, I became absolutely frustrated by the silly pieces in the early primers.  Over time it became clear that most beginners do NOT like dissonance.  Heck they're trying to learn the notes and those dissonant notes confuse them.  And Jazzy rhythms are for later.  There is,  as you note, a HUGE gap between those badly written early pieces and the easiest of the lovely classics.

 So a few years ago I decided to try to bridge that gap. I produced a series of pieces for yourg pianists which are free to download at Thehappypianomuse.wordpress.com  Each is accompanied by a few hints and is clearly labeled as to relative difficulty.   They download nicely onto standard card stock.  And if you want to hear what any of them sounds like, they all have a youtube clip attached.   ( I chuckle a bit as I remember that some of them took me longer to film correctly than to actually compose ...LOL)    You can check the companion site  Thehappypianoprofessor.wordpress.com for more background info.

I hope to eventually produce a book of easy "recital" pieces  ... even though the mere thought of recitals make me cringe. ::)   But I felt the pieces should be available online now and I publish as soon as they are completed.  I would rather offer them free and have people actually enjoy them than wait for posterity to tip it unreliable hat.   

Offline dcstudio

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Re: Teaching with no lesson book
«Reply #5 on: September 28, 2015, 10:11:51 PM »
I supplement the book with stuff I write out or arrange. 

jingle bells with finger numbers and rhythm marks scribbled on a scratch piece of paper has served as lesson material when books are forgotten...   ;D   do your own arrangements---if you have any snap at all they will be better than the store bought variety--especially for the lower levels.

Offline devron

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Re: Teaching with no lesson book
«Reply #6 on: September 29, 2015, 01:37:27 AM »
What I began to do in these past couple weeks which has been very successful for rhythm and familiarity with the keyboard.  I begin with what's called note practice étude on black keys to white keys play week 1 4,3,2,1 to b with your LH then week 2 3,2,1 to e LH up the piano and down.  To assist with that I have them play either e then b or just the notes themselves with a whole, half, quater rhythm depend on how well they understand it how complicated the rhythms gets.  Then week 3 4,3,2,1 to f RH and 3,2,1 to c RH down the piano and up.  Adding all four notes together I have kids pick a random order of notes to compose and they find these notes with hands together thumbs so what one hand learn they see it with the other together then adding rhythm makes it fun and complicated

Kids have been enjoying this quite a bit and the possibilities are endless for composition as you start to add the notes and they learn their scales with both hands together as in LH plays the first few then rh hands takes the top of the scAle.

Offline dcstudio

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Re: Teaching with no lesson book
«Reply #7 on: September 29, 2015, 02:50:05 PM »


All of my students will know all 12 scales at least in 1,2 octaves depending on age they will be played e.h.a. Or b.t.h. and it will be there choice if they want to take them to 4 octaves.  I use scales as practice for reading review but it is not enough notes to make music seem less intimidating.  I have album for the young, first lessons in bach, kabeleski, I want more variety and easier music but LH concentrated with no treble. I like using Hanon as reading practice and following music but That only goes so far.

Any suggestions?

you are a brand new teacher... these are your first students?  

that seems like a great plan... let me know how it works out for you.

how old are you if you don't mind my asking?

I am guessing you are not a recent graduate of music school or you wouldn't be asking how to count something...

are you teaching in a studio?  the neighbors kids?   how did you get into teaching piano.

all 12 scales?  I am guessing you meant scales in all 12 keys?  which scales exactly?

Offline devron

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Re: Teaching with no lesson book
«Reply #8 on: September 29, 2015, 04:50:27 PM »
I am 24 years old I have a degree in mathematics as well as a degree in music studies from University of South Florida, I teach through a studio near my house six days week.

  I meant all 12 major scales, it is how I was taught I sat down and played all of my minors in a day melodic, harmonic and natural in 3rds, 6ths, and 10ths. I never played one minor scale with my teacher before or my professor in college, I know people argue against in on here but I was raised on hanon it makes me love the piano and gave me the chops I have today, I just learned 11-15 today I only got to play 1-10 my entire life needless to say there awesome.  Off topic but I had to share that it's exciting.

Offline dcstudio

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Re: Teaching with no lesson book
«Reply #9 on: September 29, 2015, 05:46:32 PM »


and this counting threw you? with a degree in mathematics

music studies--I have never heard of such a degree...  is it a liberal arts type thing?  your professor never made you play a minor scale at music school?  please... I went to music school...

you misuse your terminology--it's a telltale sign... and I am still waiting to hear how the harmonic series relates to counting  a measure of 6/8 with a triplet on the first half and a quad over the second triplet--or did you just think I wouldn't understand it either? lol

this is pretty basic stuff here...  really basic stuff for someone with a degree... seriously

how do use scales as practice for reading review..  ?   you mean you read the scales?  you don't know them by rote and you have a degree...in music?  come on...

you still make no sense my friend...

I have been doing this far too long...  stop with the BS.  you don't have to pretend here.

I am guessing you took a lot of piano lessons and now you just started to teach at a studio full of kids... your piano lessons at college must have been as non-music major--or at best as your secondary.  You can't take lessons as a music major and not play your minor scales... you can't take theory and not know your scales...

if you need help--people will help you... but don't misrepresent yourself and throw around music terms that you don't understand in an effort to bolster your image... some of us know what we are talking about here...you will catch a ton of heat here for that.








Offline devron

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Re: Teaching with no lesson book
«Reply #10 on: September 29, 2015, 06:45:22 PM »
I didn't not say it threw me I ask for better ways to practice it which you gave and thank you. I'm not trying to misrepresent anything. It is a degree for people would like to continue to study music but leaves upper level credit hours open for another major. 

Post that on the other article where it should be posted.

Yes I write these scales out by hand and have the read them so they associate the sharps and flats with lines and spaces on the scale to learn the lines and spaces of treble and bass

If your majors are good enough yes you can
 

Run through your scales like that see if you can do it in one sitting

Offline dcstudio

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Re: Teaching with no lesson book
«Reply #11 on: September 29, 2015, 07:29:22 PM »
No you said..

.This a measure from his work gonzo's blue dream I my question is on beats 4,5,6 what are good ways or ideas to count the beats as well as the subdivision be causes it reoccurs with a different left hand a few times.

give it up--I am done with this

it was fun...

but you have no idea what you are talking about...

look up those terms before you use them.  It's a dead giveaway that you are full of it.

Offline devron

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Re: Teaching with no lesson book
«Reply #12 on: September 29, 2015, 07:34:58 PM »
Ok occurs with different rh rhythms also, you play it. You talk like it's simple, no you derailed this post

Offline dcstudio

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Re: Teaching with no lesson book
«Reply #13 on: September 29, 2015, 07:53:54 PM »
Ok occurs with different rh rhythms also, you play it. You talk like it's simple, no you derailed this post

no it doesn't    a polyrhythm is two contrasting rhythms played at the same time.

you may having alternating rhythms in the right hand--but that's not a polyrhythm as it's defined.

I have been teaching piano for 20 years... do you honestly think I don't know this stuff?  you are the one that tried to explain things with words you didn't understand.  You tried to tell me you got a music degree without playing a minor scale

 I can play all my scales in one sitting because it's REQUIRED at music school...lol it's easy as crap for me...  major, minor, all the major modes, harmonic minor + modes, melodic minor, pentatonic, octatonic and any other scale you can think of--as can ANY graduate from the piano dept.

it wouldn't matter--but you said you were a teacher...  that's why I have continued to argue this pointless thread.

that's how I know you are not telling me the truth... as will everyone else who reads this string.


Online dogperson

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Re: Teaching with no lesson book
«Reply #14 on: September 29, 2015, 08:27:52 PM »
Devron, I also find your posts confusing , not only your questions but some of the terminology you use.  There is only one way to count polyrhythms, with the only variation being the necessary adaptation from 3 vs 2 to 4 vs. 3, etc.  It is always the variation in rhythm between RH and LH.  Always.    This skill and counting is not introduced until later in training, usually around level 4 or 5.  Your lower level students should start with basic theory.  I can't understand how you are just doing this verbally as there needs to be exercises for students to confirm understanding.

The terminology you use and the abbreviations are not standard for anyone with extensive training, much less any type of degree.  BTH is always BHT, both hands together.  We all make typos, but there are a number of inconsistencies which causes question.  You can be the newest beginner or the most experienced and you will get help here.. and your posts, terminology and abbreviations are not consistent with any degree.

I would look at Nikky's music, but supplement that with beginning books for notes, time signatures, rhythm, etc.   If you are teaching a group of beginners, I hope you will adequately line up what you are doing with what they need.

Offline dcstudio

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Re: Teaching with no lesson book
«Reply #15 on: September 29, 2015, 09:47:13 PM »
It is always the variation in rhythm between RH and LH.  Always. 

  

The terminology you use and the abbreviations are not standard for anyone with extensive training, much less any type of degree. 

thanks dog! :) 

 well said... and  a bit nicer than me...

harmonic series... to sub divide a beat...    poyrhythms --not together


why do people think they can fool me into thinking they know something about music because they can say --circle of fifths or polyrhythm (that is a popular one!)  lol 


some of us went to theory class and paid attention.

Offline devron

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Re: Teaching with no lesson book
«Reply #16 on: September 30, 2015, 01:03:23 AM »
Yes I understand that and this is something to show a student so they can physically see what's happening, in the polyrhythm. BHT was a typo, I know and understand what I am talking about. I agree with my professor about the same stink that do is having, the beat is a sound whether I am playing nots against the rhythm or not, don't care what is taught this is what makes more sense to me.

You don't hear or feel a beat your not in rhythm that is plain and simple. Harmonic series was a reference to show how close the notes can be put together to show in 2 against 3 and 3 against 4 or vice versa which notes come before and after the other. 


Offline outin

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Re: Teaching with no lesson book
«Reply #17 on: September 30, 2015, 02:55:01 AM »
I think the University of South Florida is severely lacking in requiring their students to be able to write in English. Because really, the OP's posts are just incomprehensible  ::)

Offline dcstudio

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Re: Teaching with no lesson book
«Reply #18 on: September 30, 2015, 03:28:28 AM »
Yes I understand that and this is something to show a student so they can physically see what's happening, in the polyrhythm. BHT was a typo, I know and understand what I am talking about. I agree with my professor about the same stink that do is having, the beat is a sound whether I am playing nots against the rhythm or not, don't care what is taught this is what makes more sense to me.

You don't hear or feel a beat your not in rhythm that is plain and simple. Harmonic series was a reference to show how close the notes can be put together to show in 2 against 3 and 3 against 4 or vice versa which notes come before and after the other. 





I just can't listen to this BS any more
 you know...if you hadn't posted that question about how to count a measure of 6/8  with 3 against 4  you may have gotten away with this a bit longer

again you make no SENSE


you argued with me about a polyrhythm --

Offline keypeg

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Re: Teaching with no lesson book
«Reply #19 on: September 30, 2015, 08:09:25 AM »
I am confused.  I see references to polyrhythm, the harmonic series, and something about "gonzo's blue dream" and these things being refuted or criticized or something.  But when I look in this thread for when they were mentioned by Devron, I cannot find them.  Did they get deleted?  Are they in a different thread? 

Offline devron

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Re: Teaching with no lesson book
«Reply #20 on: September 30, 2015, 08:14:02 AM »
Different thread dc decided to combine them both

Offline devron

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Re: Teaching with no lesson book
«Reply #21 on: September 30, 2015, 08:29:07 AM »
I think the University of South Florida is severely lacking in requiring their students to be able to write in English. Because really, the OP's posts are just incomprehensible  ::)

 I may not be able to spell but I sure as hell know my way around a piano for being 24