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Topic: Adult Learning Alone  (Read 2195 times)

Offline tmcgartland

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Adult Learning Alone
on: June 19, 2015, 07:13:17 AM
I have had lessons in the past and decided to go it alone. I have to admit that I find this quite frustrating. My big problem is rythmn. If I look at a piece of music, no matter how simple I have no idea as to how it should be played. I normally will source a sound recording before making an attempt on the notation.

I have a cabinet full of arrangements and sheet music but its pretty useless if I don't know the basics. I have decided to get a Grade One book and start with the basics, is this a good choice in learning?

Offline chopinlover01

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Re: Adult Learning Alone
Reply #1 on: June 19, 2015, 07:16:04 AM
Your best choice in learning would be to get a good teacher. Going it alone is hard enough at any point when you're still significantly developing your technique, let alone the beginning of your playing.

Offline faa2010

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Re: Adult Learning Alone
Reply #2 on: June 19, 2015, 08:27:46 AM
I also have problems with rhythm. I have played for a time by myself, but in the end I returned to the same point: finding a good teacher, a good coach.

There are music topics which can be learnt like in English, Literature, Maths, Physics, etc.

However, there are other parts in music which are more abstract and can only be learnt with someone who can show you the right path like body movement, with just feeling, not thinking, making a good balance between reason and emotions.

That is where you need to find someone who can show you the right way to listen, sing and play music, someone who can help you remember how to perceive and feel music (I say it because in kindergarten, I suppose, we learn it before we go to a more systematize process where music is taught in a same or similar way subjects like Math, Science, Physics, English are taught, or undervaluated).

Maybe you don't want a teacher in this moment, so try to go to dance classes, they can help you with the rhythm issue. I am thinking, once I have enough time, on going to aerobics or dance classes (or in Blu Ray or DVD), where they use music and you move based on how the music is.

Offline compline

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Re: Adult Learning Alone
Reply #3 on: June 19, 2015, 09:01:09 AM
HI tmc.   Have you tried clapping the rhythm following the notes...  a bit like, tum te tum tum , tum tum, tum, te tum, according to how the notes go of course,  that's what I do with a new piece.  Look up the piece you are playing on youtube and get into the rhythm.  
Or as someone else suggested, dance to music and learn  rhythm.

Offline outin

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Re: Adult Learning Alone
Reply #4 on: June 19, 2015, 11:02:47 AM
If I understand you correctly your problems with rhythm are not just how to keep it while playing. It sounds like you don't actually understand rhytmic notation properly?

I suggest you get a theory book or find a page on the internet where rhytms and note values are explained and then do some old style school work away from the piano: Pick a simple piece, analyse the first measures and write down how they should be counted taking both hands into consideration. Then play slowly and count aloud or in your mind as you go. Do this at least for the most common meters. This may seem boring and difficult at first, but it really doesn't take long before you will be able to just see immediately how it should go. This is the theoretical basis that you will absolutely need, only after that comes how to keep a nice steady pulse while playing.

Offline tmcgartland

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Re: Adult Learning Alone
Reply #5 on: June 19, 2015, 11:13:45 AM
Thank you for all the comments, they are welcome.
Last night I put all my piano books away and make the conscious decision that this problem needed to be addressed from the ground up.

I took a Grade 1 Trinity Exam book and sat and clapped out a 3/4 rhythm and followed to play the right hand only. After a few minutes of this, I could 'hear' the actual melody and beat.

Is this good practice?

Offline outin

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Re: Adult Learning Alone
Reply #6 on: June 19, 2015, 11:59:39 AM


Is this good practice?

Anything that works is good practice :)

Offline visitor

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Re: Adult Learning Alone
Reply #7 on: June 19, 2015, 12:02:10 PM

Offline j_menz

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Re: Adult Learning Alone
Reply #8 on: June 19, 2015, 12:10:54 PM


Which is why BJ is famous as a bricklayer (in what wherein he was trained) and not as a playwright and author (in what wherein he was self taught).
"What the world needs is more geniuses with humility. There are so few of us left" -- Oscar Levant

Offline visitor

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Re: Adult Learning Alone
Reply #9 on: June 19, 2015, 12:19:53 PM
Which is why BJ is famous as a bricklayer (in what wherein he was trained) and not as a playwright and author (in what wherein he was self taught).

or as le French say, touché (aka good point)  ;D

Offline maxyim

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Re: Adult Learning Alone
Reply #10 on: July 14, 2015, 08:46:15 PM
I second the points about getting a teacher.  Just one lesson a month can give you a great deal of benefit.  If you are able to play well by ear, you won't need as many lessons, but if you are having trouble with rhythm, then you are likely not in this category, so my best recommendation would be to bite the bullet and make the investment.

Offline twelfthroot2

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Re: Adult Learning Alone
Reply #11 on: July 17, 2015, 06:22:55 PM
One thing that helps me make rhythms much easier is to keep time with your foot/leg either with the tempo or in double-time or anything else that you find works.  When I do this I don't actually count the number of foot movements per beat, but it just helps to give a general idea of time as opposed to doing it just in my head.  It's worth a try.

Tony

Offline dcstudio

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Re: Adult Learning Alone
Reply #12 on: July 17, 2015, 08:03:17 PM

or as le French say, touché (aka good point)  ;D

love this...lol
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