Piano Forum logo
November 25, 2017, 11:15:37 AM *
   Forum Home   Help Search  


Simplicity Meets Complexity in Denk’s Piano Boot Camp

When NPR invaded Jeremy Denk’s home he was seriously practicing the piano etudes of György Ligeti. His music is “continuous madness,” Denk says. “Wonderful, joyful madness.” Denk has a great talent for making you fall in love with the most complex music, letting it sound completely natural. Read more >>

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Jazz starter  (Read 842 times)
expressman70
PS Silver Member
Jr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 96


« on: August 05, 2015, 07:17:13 PM »

Hello all,
   
      I am a classical musician but want to start playing jazz, and learning to improvise. I am very good at following books and self teaching teqnique, so could anyone recommend a great source for that such as theory book specifically with that. I do have an ability to improvise, but it doesn't appear as jazzy when executed. I just need theoretical base for it which i lack in this field.

Thank you!
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
dcstudio
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 2420


« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2015, 09:58:49 PM »

good at books--get "the Jazz Language" by Dan Haerle--he was my prof... he has lectures posted on YT, too.


it doesn't appear as jazzy?   it will...just give it time...lol...      the most common complaint from beginners is -- "but it doesn't sound like jazz!!"     it's not just the notes that make it sound like that...   it's really tough to learn to swing...and to walk bass...  and when you do finally get it you feel like an idiot --  because you realize it's not hard to do at all...once you know how.

it looks so easy...  because it really is easy...  and that is the single biggest problem lifer classicals have with the whole idea...   they just won't believe it...     so they make it far more complex than it is.

listen and play along with recordings of your favorite players...in my day all we had were Jamie Aebersold records---they were basically just backing tracks...(btw--the book I told you about was written by Jamie's piano player)  now you have youtube..

how much classical music do you listen to now/  and while you were learning???   You have to create that same "data base" for jazz, too..    if you can sleep with it playing somewhere in your room...you should

Formal theory and jazz theory are just two different  ways of describing exactly the same thing.

jazz theory is meant to be understood quickly...  the terminology is far more logical...as are the concepts...  

this is Oscar Peterson...   the GREATEST...  playing LIVE

this is what jazz sounds like... Cool

https://youtu.be/rZbSonHGVXc
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

expressman70
PS Silver Member
Jr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 96


« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2015, 12:31:47 AM »

Thank you for the reply, I will definately look into it.
 
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  


Need more info or help?


Search pianostreet.com - the web's largest resource of information about piano playing:



 
Jump to:  


Most popular classical piano composers:
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

o