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Baby Grand (Read 1227 times)

Offline adodd81802

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Baby Grand
« on: November 06, 2015, 05:30:10 PM »
In the UK, delivery is a big deal along with eBay, and with pianos in particular you can pick up some crazy deals if you're willing to pick up or arrange a delivery company.

Because the UK is a reasonably small country, and an Island, particularly baby grands, sellers are forced to put these instruments on at a cheap price, primarily because of space I imagine - houses in the UK are a lot smaller generally.

So my question is, are they worth it. Is it worth getting any baby grand as opposed to an upright? Are there baby grands that you should avoid?

I know it's not a grand and I have read suggestions that some good designed uprights can be better?

Here's a couple examples, it's in , but I think the USD exchange rate is around 1.5?

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Challen-Baby-Grand-Piano-/321911898012?hash=item4af371bf9c:g:ucsAAOSw9mFWHt5L

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Baby-Grand-Piano-DAlmaine-Mahogany-Good-Condition-/301787995578?hash=item4643f75dba:g:TIAAAOSw5VFWOIJT
"England is a country of pianos, they are everywhere."

Offline chopinlover01

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Re: Baby Grand
«Reply #1 on: November 06, 2015, 10:53:07 PM »
I can't open the links right now (on mobile), but my advice is to always go with a grand over an upright. The sound in a top notch upright may be slightly better, but due to other mechanics of grands (horizontally placed action allowing for faster trills and repeated notes and una cords pedals).
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Offline lhorwinkle

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Re: Baby Grand
«Reply #2 on: November 06, 2015, 11:20:02 PM »
I wonder why people don't simply donate a piano rather than accept 100 quid.

Are charitable contributions deductible from your income tax in the UK?

They are in the US. So I donated my large Kawai upright some years ago. I had an appraisal at around $4000, which translated to about $1000 tax savings.

I would have been hard pressed to find a buyer for it, so it was better to donate than to sell.

But I cannot know whether such applies in the UK.  If it does, though, you have to wonder what that 100 pound piano is really worth. If it's in decent shape, it's worth more as a tax-advantaged donation. So if it's for sale at 100 quid, I wonder whether it's a junker.

Offline chopinlover01

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Re: Baby Grand
«Reply #3 on: November 06, 2015, 11:44:21 PM »
Buying a piano before hearing it or playing it is also not a good idea. Especially buying it off a site like Ebay.
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Offline adodd81802

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Re: Baby Grand
«Reply #4 on: November 06, 2015, 11:47:54 PM »
As mentioned, it's hard to get rid of them in the UK, there's not a wide audience like the US or rest of Europe, and shipping is a nightmare along with UK homes being generally smaller.

Also worth bearing in mind that not everybody that sells piano does their research, a bunch of guys might do a house clearance come across it, can't be bothered to store it and stick it on eBay cheap.

I definitely agree with hearing and testing before buying, which is something I would opt to do before any bids.

Lastly, are taxes are automated here (unless we own our own business or self employed) so i don't think that works in the same way as you mentioned.
"England is a country of pianos, they are everywhere."

Offline lostinidlewonder

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Re: Baby Grand
«Reply #5 on: November 07, 2015, 02:25:18 AM »
Don't buy baby grands, you can get a quality upright for same price and it will sound a lot better. If you just want a grand for its visual appeal then I understand :)
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