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How is the quality of an Irving baby grand (Read 1079 times)

Offline jc10202010

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How is the quality of an Irving baby grand
« on: December 21, 2015, 06:46:51 PM »
This is the link to the piano.
https://losangeles.craigslist.org/sfv/msg/5368719068.html
Should I buy it?

Offline quantum

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Re: How is the quality of an Irving baby grand
«Reply #1 on: December 21, 2015, 07:44:53 PM »
Go see it.  If you are still interested, come back a second day and bring your own piano tech.  Have them give you a report on condition and potential value. 

Also depends why you want it.  If you just want it as furniture, the price is okay, but in such case I would search for give away pianos first.  If you want to play it, then you need to bring your piano tech.  Bringing a piano tech into the process will also give you leverage to adjust the price if warranted. 
Made a Liszt. Need new Handel's for Soler panel & Alkan foil. Will Faure Stein on the way to pick up Mendels' sohn. Josquin get Wolfgangs Schu with Clara. Gone Chopin, I'll be Bach

Offline indianajo

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Re: How is the quality of an Irving baby grand
«Reply #2 on: December 21, 2015, 08:39:17 PM »
Sounds like a store brand. I played a store brand grand last week rehearsing in a church.  It had decent tone, was pretty fast and had very light touch for a grand.  I liked it. It was a Willis, which is a local music  store.  No telling who made it or how old it was.
This is in a garage, to look at the picture. If it was inherited from grandma, possibly nothing is wrong with it, orther than not being a top  brand.  If the guy has other pianos, perhaps he has found something wrong with it .The price is great but that is only half the story. 
Read a paragraph in the the second half of the second post for a list of things to look for in a piano that you don't want to buy, or factor in the price of repairing if you do buy. Bad tone and cracked soundboard or frame are not IMHO economically repairable.   You can look for these things before you bring in a tech @ $150.  A tech won't be cheap in LA, and it takes at least an hour to check for loose pins with a tuning wrench (which a tech should have bring and use).  Loose pins are repairable but more than  two or three, you're looking at a new pin block - affordable but not likely to pay back at resale on a brand like this. 
Best of luck. It costs about $600 to move a grand a short distance here, probably more in LA. DIY it takes a "piano"  board, a 1200 lb dolly, (see New Haven moving equip. website)  and four really stout guys, plus a truck with a ramp and a winch, not a 30" deep lift gate.  48" lift gates might be doable, they weren't around when I was a mover.  The slope of the lift gate with 1000 lb on it is the critical factor, and the 30" ones sloped out pretty badly in 1973 with an upright on them.  I turned town a $900 chickering here in a garage for the moving and house reasons - I dldn't think my floors would support it, and I didn't have $600-800 to drop on moving it.  It was in the next county.  Pity, chickering is one of the second tier brands. 

Offline iansinclair

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Re: How is the quality of an Irving baby grand
«Reply #3 on: December 21, 2015, 10:12:10 PM »
Indianajo -- you remind me of the time I moved an old upright with three other guys from my unit, a case of beer, a 1955 Thunderbird convertible, and a low trailer... from Scott AFB over to St. Louis.  Quite a trip!
Ian

Offline indianajo

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Re: How is the quality of an Irving baby grand
«Reply #4 on: December 22, 2015, 12:53:38 AM »
Piano inspection link disappeared.  See 2nd post on this last half:
http://www.pianostreet.com/smf/index.php?topic=56680.0
Ian, I hope it didn't rain in 1955.  My uncle had a '56 bird, came to visit us in Houston in '58.  He said it had the "roast-a-foot" option, and was the worse car he ever owned.  By '59 when my Dad bought a Ford, they had huge 12"x6" horns in the front to blow air on your feet in the front. 
One of the uprights in 73 I had to move, the "peakload" man on my end collapsed on the stairs, and we other three had to carry it over him.  I was on the low end with him.  I'd like a tinkly upright now for ragtime, but I'm not the man I used to be, even when they show up free on craigslist. 
Fortunately, My Mother had bought a 1946 40" Everett console piano, and I followed her lead in 1982 when I bought my Sohmer 39 console.  Only 300 lb.