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Topic: ATCL Programme  (Read 5349 times)

Offline loisbarr99

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ATCL Programme
on: December 23, 2015, 01:38:17 AM
So I'm trying to figure out my ATCL programme and I've been reading up on what to put in it, and I've been trying to make it as balanced as possible. My main problem is that most people seem to put a larger scale work in their programme and end up with 4 pieces in their programme, which apparently trinity like (?) whereas I've currently got 6 pieces in mine, the longest being about 7 minutes. This is what I've got in my programme at the minute:

Haydn - Sonata in D Hob. XVI/51
Debussy - Menuet from Suite Bergamasque
Brahms - Rhapsody in G minor op. 79 no. 2
Chopin - Nocturne op. 9 no. 1
Rachmaninoff - Prelude in E flat op. 23 no. 6
Bach - Prelude and Fugue in D minor BWV 875 (book 2)

I'm unsure about the Bach, I really only put it in there to make it up to the time and to add something baroque - if anyone has any advice for me on making it more balanced or whether it should be shorter (as in less pieces, replaced by a longer one) it would be greatly appreciated! I prefer playing romantic style pieces, and I'd say the Brahms is probably my favourite, followed by the Chopin or the Rachmanioff if that helps at all.

Offline visitor

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Re: ATCL Programme
Reply #1 on: December 23, 2015, 11:25:36 AM
You should include something w a more modern ish sound or that uses composition techniques post turn of the century.  You have Impressionist and neo romantic, both of which are antiquated in terms of the larger Era they originate from.

may not have to be true contemporary ie post 1980 but lack of contrast to something sounding made 20th century or around there makes the  programming fairly boring and the lack of a newer work is a glaring omission.

maybe some Talma or Honegger or similar?
Just a couple ideas but feelfree to branch off these aand see what you find




Maybe look to a respected and important very high output composer like Milhaud,  hmm mid century the op numbers were high, this hymn de glorification op 331 is legit

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Re: ATCL Programme
Reply #2 on: December 23, 2015, 01:31:52 PM
btw Milhaud is a really great go to resource for a lot of stuff, few composers matched his total  output and diversity and high percentage of quality of works in so many genre's. Well worth exploring and studying...
"...nine operas, 12 ballets, 12 symphonies (in addition to six chamber symphonies), six piano concertos (one of them a double concerto), 18 string quartets, and about 400 other compositions in almost every conceivable form and instrumentation. The most frequently discussed feature of his musical language is polytonality (the simultaneous use of multiple tonal centers), though Milhaud was familiar with and fluent in any number of twentieth century "techniques." A skillful contrapuntist, Milhaud composed two string quartets (Nos. 14 and 15, both from 1949) which may also be performed simultaneously as an octet...."

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Re: ATCL Programme
Reply #3 on: December 23, 2015, 01:38:07 PM
on Honegger short snip from his gen bio
"...Born in France to Swiss parents, Arthur Honegger was a major twentieth century composer whose musical style was more cosmopolitan than either French or Swiss. An almost exact contemporary of Prokofiev (1891-1953), he rivaled Poulenc as the most successful member of Les Six and was without doubt among the greatest French composers of his day. Stylistically, he was quite protean, eschewing the Impressionism of Debussy while absorbing certain features of neo-Classicism and taking on a sometimes brash and usually rugged expressive manner, always within a tonal context...."

Offline loisbarr99

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Re: ATCL Programme
Reply #4 on: December 23, 2015, 02:56:19 PM
Thanks - I'll have a look at some more modern pieces. I suppose I should replace the Chopin perhaps since I already have a romantic piece in the form of Brahms, although they are quite different, and considering as the Rachmanioff prelude is quite romantic in style also. Do you think it's alright to have 6 shorter pieces without a larger scale work then?

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Re: ATCL Programme
Reply #5 on: December 23, 2015, 03:21:22 PM
Thanks - I'll have a look at some more modern pieces. I suppose I should replace the Chopin perhaps since I already have a romantic piece in the form of Brahms, although they are quite different, and considering as the Rachmanioff prelude is quite romantic in style also. Do you think it's alright to have 6 shorter pieces without a larger scale work then?
if the requirements don't state it has to be an extended form work, then probably not a big deal. though for me, if it's a 'best practice' to do so, i would reconsider, or i would use say a set of shorts/related pieces like a suite or something that shows some tie continuity between them but if the formal requirement leave it to you, do what you want and prefer. good luck. i think the blanching of style is higher on pecking order of importance vs the number or pieces or length of them w regard to effective programming and balance.  your inquiry is more akin to the pacing of the program which is important too but more a consideration if a recreational recital vs fulfillment of a formal requirement.

Offline rohaniyer

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Re: ATCL Programme
Reply #6 on: December 28, 2015, 12:58:45 AM
Hi :)

I too, am preparing for my ATCL programme.

On the Trinity Diploma Syllabus, it does state there should also be a range of moods and tempi, so when you are looking for your "balance", this is just a reminder not to solely look at the era from which the piece is from ;)

Whilst it doesn't explicitly mention that there should be a large scale work, I think they are slightly hinting at it, because they do say that constructing your programme around a more "complete" work is a useful approach to planning the diploma.

If I were you, I would add a large scale work, because for me at least, I feel there is a great degree of personal fulfilment, once you have learnt a large piece in it's entirety... you feel like a completionist :P Thats just my opinion though... you might prefer, and enjoy exploring pieces from different eras, for lots of contrast.

This is what my programme is looking like:
Poulenc - Trois Novelettes (No 1 and No 2)
Handel - Suite No. 8
Grieg - Sonata

So I've got Baroque (Handel), Romantic (Grieg), and 20th Century/Neoclassical (Poulenc). I'm not awfully fond of the classical era, but still, I like to think I have a good spread.

If you're looking for a large scale Romantic piece, I would highly recommend the Grieg! And don't forget, you can pick pieces from outside the list as well...! Do update us on any changes you make/pieces you are considering. :)

Good luck! :)

Rohan

Offline loisbarr99

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Re: ATCL Programme
Reply #7 on: December 28, 2015, 06:51:56 PM
Hi :)

I too, am preparing for my ATCL programme.

On the Trinity Diploma Syllabus, it does state there should also be a range of moods and tempi, so when you are looking for your "balance", this is just a reminder not to solely look at the era from which the piece is from ;)

Whilst it doesn't explicitly mention that there should be a large scale work, I think they are slightly hinting at it, because they do say that constructing your programme around a more "complete" work is a useful approach to planning the diploma.

If I were you, I would add a large scale work, because for me at least, I feel there is a great degree of personal fulfilment, once you have learnt a large piece in it's entirety... you feel like a completionist :P Thats just my opinion though... you might prefer, and enjoy exploring pieces from different eras, for lots of contrast.

This is what my programme is looking like:
Poulenc - Trois Novelettes (No 1 and No 2)
Handel - Suite No. 8
Grieg - Sonata

So I've got Baroque (Handel), Romantic (Grieg), and 20th Century/Neoclassical (Poulenc). I'm not awfully fond of the classical era, but still, I like to think I have a good spread.

If you're looking for a large scale Romantic piece, I would highly recommend the Grieg! And don't forget, you can pick pieces from outside the list as well...! Do update us on any changes you make/pieces you are considering. :)

Good luck! :)

Rohan

Thank you so much, this was very helpful! I had thought that maybe it was a better idea to choose a large scale work, so to hear from you as you are also planning your programme is a great help, I think I'm going to try a find a larger scale work suited to me.

My only dilemma is that I do love the Brahms, Rachmanioff and the Haydn, which would be 2 romantic pieces and a classical meaning I should really find a larger scale baroque work which would pain me as I dislike playing baroque pieces and I wouldn't really have anything representing the 20th century aspect.

Maybe I should look into doing a larger classical work and replace the Haydn? Then I'd keep the Prelude & Fugue, or look into other baroque pieces.

I'm going to consult my piano teacher in all this once I go back to lessons after Christmas, but I think I'll look into a larger scale work for the time being.

Offline rohaniyer

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Re: ATCL Programme
Reply #8 on: December 30, 2015, 12:09:59 AM
I'm glad you found my post helpful! :)

Yeah, if you wanted a large scale Baroque work, you'd have the Handel, and 2 French Suites by Bach to choose from. Whereas, if you replace the Haydn, you might be able to choose from the Mozart or Beethoven sonatas.

Toss them about, look at the other pieces on the list, and see which ones you think fit best :).

Here is quite a nice little 20th century work, amongst the others, from the list:



Rohan

Offline symphonicdance

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Re: ATCL Programme
Reply #9 on: December 31, 2015, 02:47:20 PM
Yours is considered (well) balanced already.  I had also got 6 pieces in my AT programme:  Bach, Mozart, Brahms, Debussy, Szymanowski and Rachmaninoff.  My longest one is a Mozart sonata which took about 9-10 min (w/o repeats).

If you then go for LT, then probably you may wish to include a long sonata.  But in my LT case, of the 4 works in my programme, the longest one is still only 10-11 min.  Bach, Mozart, Ravel, Prokofiev (no romantic composer!) are also considered balanced.

FT allows specialisation.

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