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Yamaha C3 and Ritmuller (Read 3301 times)

Offline jar711

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Yamaha C3 and Ritmuller
« on: December 23, 2015, 02:19:16 AM »
Hello, I have been reading on this forum for a while, but I am a new member.
I am currently shopping for a baby grand or grand piano. While I have tried to do my research and shop around, I was wondering if I could get some input about several pianos.

I found a piano technician who is selling a Yamaha C3 for $11,000. It is about 30years old, but in good condition, and he recently changed the strings, tuned and voiced the piano.

However, recently I played several new Ritmuller baby grand pianos that are selling for around the same price (R8 and GH 160), and I was quite surprised. I know little about Ritmuller, except that they are Chinese made pianos, but I was actually impressed with the quality of the tone and action of the piano.

Has anyone owned or played a Ritmuller that is older? Or is anyone familiar with how they hold up with time and playing? I know Yamahas have a reputation of being durable, even with heavy playing over time. I'm not sure if it even makes sense to compare these two pianos, but just wanted to get some input. Thanks!

Offline richard black

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Re: Yamaha C3 and Ritmuller
«Reply #1 on: December 24, 2015, 05:34:56 PM »
Yamahas aren't particularly durable but they do better than most Chinese pianos. The oldest Ritmuller I've seen was probably only about 5 years old and was getting quite clattery. A 30-year old piano, as long as the hammers, dampers and action parts are all working OK, way still outlast the Ritmuller. Also the strings are one of the weakest parts of a Yamaha and if the technician has used decent ones it's probably better than new in some ways.
Instrumentalists are all wannabe singers. Discuss.

Offline jar711

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Re: Yamaha C3 and Ritmuller
«Reply #2 on: December 31, 2015, 04:25:59 PM »
Thanks for your input!

Offline anie

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Re: Yamaha C3 and Ritmuller
«Reply #3 on: January 03, 2016, 10:50:54 PM »
. . .
However, recently I played several new Ritmuller baby grand pianos that are selling for around the same price (R8 and GH 160), and I was quite surprised. I know little about Ritmuller, except that they are Chinese made pianos, but I was actually impressed with the quality of the tone and action of the piano.

Has anyone owned or played a Ritmuller that is older? Or is anyone familiar with how they hold up with time and playing? I know Yamahas have a reputation of being durable, even with heavy playing over time. I'm not sure if it even makes sense to compare these two pianos, but just wanted to get some input. Thanks!

The GH 160 is a newer one from 2009, designed by Lothar Thomma (who was key with the Steingraebers and instrumental at Bechstein, I read).  He also oversees production quality of this Chinese piano. It's a premium model, different from the R-series most have seen until recently.  Made with quality parts and craftsmanship.  Pianobuyer magazine run by Larry Fine thinks it's a good piano.
   
  A review that caught my eye and was the reason I tried one out (and bought one) is at http://www.pianobuyer.com/PDFarchive/2009_ChineseGrands.pdf
  The writer is a registered piano technician and was "Editor of the Piano Technicians Journal."

  Excerpt:
Quote
" This arrangement permits the bass bridge to vibrate more freely, among other things giving the bass sound greater clarity. Although this phenomenon was amply demonstrated by all three pianos, it was especially noticeable on the 5' 3" model, which lacked the "muddy" bass often characteristic of small grands. The new Ritmüllers also have solid spruce soundboards and vertically laminated bridges, better-quality features that arguably enhance tonal color.

I liked the sound quality and sustain of all the Ritmüller models. The medium-tension stringing scale avoids the excessive high harmonics and inharmonicity characteristic of the higher-tension scales sometimes found in modern pianos, producing instead a clear, bell-like, uncomplicatedly "European" sound. And these models' light, responsive action makes it easy to attain a great dynamic range from very soft to very loud and full."

Here are the specs by the manufacturer
  that describe the type of parts used:
   http://www.pearlriverusa.com/cms/?page_id=1431

My piano technician (from the shop) was the technician for the Sacramento Symphony (before it ended) and does the work for a college in that area.  He thinks the piano is really unusually well built.

There's a Ritmuller thread in these forums, and I posted other things on it.  I'm biased as an owner of one since May 2015.

Hope you check it out a bit more. 




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