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The Czech pianist Ivan Moravec's recordings for Connoisseur Society were notable for their audiophile quality and nearly all of them remain available, long after the LP era, on CD reissues. He is described by New Grove as one of the finest Chopin interpreters of that century. Listen to Moravec recording and discussing Chopin. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Textures of scale degrees (ear training)  (Read 771 times)
boxjuice
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« on: February 10, 2016, 12:42:40 AM »

Ive been doing interval training and i recently read about scale degree training. I tried it out on this app that plays a random string of 5 notes, starting out with just the tonic, mediant, and dominant, but progressively more and more degrees added after each level. While the tonic is easily recognised by it's sense of resolution, i struggled to distiguish the mediant and dominatant. Is there anything like the reference songs for interval training, that can be used on scale degree training to help distinguish the degree.

Thanks,
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where_july
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« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2016, 09:31:07 AM »

Is there anything like the reference songs for interval training, that can be used on scale degree training to help distinguish the degree.

Thanks,

This is the music subject that teaches what you ask for:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solf%C3%A8ge

So while singinig through the subject' lessons your inner pitch feeling is trained to distinguish among intervals (relative pitch) and content of chords.

For excercise you would be fine write down the intervals through any of the piece you play and singing these pitch precise, then say the name yourself. Probably some cheap or free text book on basic solfeggio would do you good too.

V.
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