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Topic: Learning Large Pieces???  (Read 1574 times)

Offline skywalker_06

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Learning Large Pieces???
on: February 18, 2016, 08:52:55 PM
So I've learned some pretty large pieces in the past (Beethoven 3rd mvt concerto no. 4, Chopin Fantasie and Ballade no. 1, a few Haydn/Beethoven sonatas, etc) but it always takes me SO LONG to learn these pieces up to a good standard and I was wondering what tips anyone had for learning pieces WELL but in a timely manner. I'm planning to learn all of Chopin's 1st concerto and while it's not too difficult for me to sight read through, it still takes me a while to read through the piece, even slowly. So how should I go about learning large pieces? Read through the whole thing countless times slowly with both hands until it's memorized and I can get it up to tempo? Focus on smaller bits then move onto a new section? Also, I have a really really bad habit of stopping and starting when I'm sight reading (and practicing in general), so any tips anyone has on this general topic would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!
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Offline ahinton

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Re: Learning Large Pieces???
Reply #1 on: February 18, 2016, 10:01:26 PM
So I've learned some pretty large pieces in the past (Beethoven 3rd mvt concerto no. 4, Chopin Fantasie and Ballade no. 1, a few Haydn/Beethoven sonatas, etc) but it always takes me SO LONG to learn these pieces up to a good standard and I was wondering what tips anyone had for learning pieces WELL but in a timely manner. I'm planning to learn all of Chopin's 1st concerto and while it's not too difficult for me to sight read through, it still takes me a while to read through the piece, even slowly. So how should I go about learning large pieces? Read through the whole thing countless times slowly with both hands until it's memorized and I can get it up to tempo? Focus on smaller bits then move onto a new section? Also, I have a really really bad habit of stopping and starting when I'm sight reading (and practicing in general), so any tips anyone has on this general topic would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!
"Large" pieces? Try some Sorabji - or Busoni's piano concerto - or Alkan's Opp. 35/39, Finnissy's A History of Photography in Sound et al...

Best,

Alistair
Alistair Hinton
Curator / Director
The Sorabji Archive

Offline medtnaculus

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Re: Learning Large Pieces???
Reply #2 on: February 19, 2016, 12:19:52 AM
"Large" pieces? Try some Sorabji - or Busoni's piano concerto - or Alkan's Opp. 35/39, Finnissy's A History of Photography in Sound et al...

Best,

Alistair

Jean Catoire's Piano sonata, Opus 420 (not Georgy), not only long but also BLAND

Offline ahinton

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Re: Learning Large Pieces???
Reply #3 on: February 19, 2016, 08:26:18 AM
Jean Catoire's Piano sonata, Opus 420 (not Georgy), not only long but also BLAND
You're telling me it is - as indeed is most of his work tht I've encountered; if Catoire, then...

Best,

Alistair
Alistair Hinton
Curator / Director
The Sorabji Archive

Offline xdjuicebox

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Re: Learning Large Pieces???
Reply #4 on: February 19, 2016, 10:42:35 AM
It's all about how you organize it. Very important to have it memorized too.

I divide every piece I play [if it's long] into sections, and if it's in a recognizable form (pardon my lack of theory skills), then that makes it even more convenient.

Don't play long pieces again and again, you won't better that way. Pick a few sections you want to work on and just drill those for the day.
I am trying to become Franz Liszt. Trying. And failing.
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