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Author Topic: Need help with figured bass - Bach BWV 821 Suite (Echo)  (Read 741 times)
where_july
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« on: February 24, 2016, 09:22:41 AM »

Hello Everyone!

I just bumped into the thing I think is a figured bass in a piece I learn. I have studied figured bass before only in a text-book. Now this is the chance to apply my knowledge and I would like to make it correct way for the particular piece.

If any of you have a good understanding of the attached excerpt can you help me with the following questions (numbers refer to my notes of question shown in the piece excerpt attachment):

1. Is it at all a figured bass?
1a. Did I understand corectly the chord (triad or seventh), its notation and the inversion?
2. to 5. Same questions as above.
6. Does "4" in the score means "triad of 2nd inversion (root-4-6)" or is it a seventh chord inversion?

The entire score attached as well, the piece starts on page 850.

Thanks a lot in advance.

V.


* Bach BWV 821 Echo Bb dur excerpt.jpg (176.91 KB, 1145x465 - viewed 22 times.)
* BWV_821.pdf (1249.55 KB - downloaded 3 times.)
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michael_c
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« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2016, 12:18:46 PM »

1. Is it at all a figured bass?

Yes.

1a. Did I understand corectly the chord (triad or seventh), its notation and the inversion?
2. to 5. Same questions as above.

You've understood correctly. It's up to the player to decide on the voicing of the chords. They shouldn't be played exactly as you have written them: it would be better to take some notes an octave higher.

Does "4" in the score means "triad of 2nd inversion (root-4-6)" or is it a seventh chord inversion?

Here you see 4 followed by 3. This implies that the 4 is a suspension. This may also be written with a 5 above the 4, but usually the 5 is left out, being taken for granted.
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where_july
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« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2016, 08:01:34 PM »

Hello michael_c,

Big THANK YOU for your detailed reply !!!))) It is perfectly clear to me now) You helped a lot)

All the best to you,
Val.
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