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String Cover? (Read 2521 times)

Offline ainmpiano

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String Cover?
« on: August 09, 2016, 12:11:28 PM »
I have been looking into string covers.

I have a new Kawai GL-30, which I will have to play with the front lid open, to use the built-in music stand. Our house is reasonably dusty, with kids and a cat.

The three leading contenders are:
http://dawsonstringcovers.com/contact
http://www.pianocovers.net/services.htm
http://www.stevespianoservice.com/Online-Piano-Parts-Catalog/piano-cover-accessories.htm

The middle one uses magnets to hold the cover in place.

They run around $300 to $350, except for Steve's, which are a lot cheaper. Three hundred dollars is fairly expensive, to us anyway. But I understand a good string cover is an investment.

Has anyone bought a string cover from any of these folks?

Thanks.

Mac

Offline quantum

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Re: String Cover?
«Reply #1 on: August 09, 2016, 02:02:51 PM »
You may want to consider fabricating your own string cover if the commercial options are out of budget.  Look at the material options for commercial products and see if you can source similar things at fabric stores.
Made a Liszt. Need new Handel's for Soler panel & Alkan foil. Will Faure Stein on the way to pick up Mendels' sohn. Josquin get Wolfgangs Schu with Clara. Gone Chopin, I'll be Bach

Offline visitor

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Re: String Cover?
«Reply #2 on: August 09, 2016, 02:11:28 PM »
if you can swing it, it's a better than decent investment. especially for keeping a stable microclimate around the strings, not only does it help preserve the look of the plate, but you want to slow the rate of oxidation around the strings, especially the base.
the pricey ones I believe have a hard frame or partial to give it shape and keep the cover in place and from resting on the strings by keeping it just above. 
making your own can work if you get the pattern/size just right and can figure out a way to give it some rigidity in key spots.

I have wanted for one a while but it's been cost prohibitive so couldn't swing it yet, may see if I can make it happen this christmas.


they can help modulate slightly the volume of the piano if you use good heavy felt (there was a seller offering a cheaper crushed velvet option I have looked at as well, if the weave is loose, there's less volume dampening).

Offline ainmpiano

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Re: String Cover?
«Reply #3 on: August 09, 2016, 05:51:35 PM »
I just had an idea that might work better here. I could leave the front lid open, and use the built-in sheet music holder. When I am done, I could simply flip down the back of the sheet music holder, and use a piano cover. This cover would have been folded back at the start of play time just enough to allow me to use the built-in sheet music holder (and still cover most of the strings).

This would allow me to avoid constantly opening and closing the heavy front lid.
This would keep dust off the outside and the inside of the piano.
And I think that piano covers are a lot less expensive that string covers.

Does this make sense?

Mac

Offline quantum

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Re: String Cover?
«Reply #4 on: August 09, 2016, 06:45:26 PM »
The template of the piano with the front lid open is different to that of it closed.  There will be a portion of the lid that sticks out where the curve of the piano is.  Piano covers are usually designed to cover a fully closed piano. 

You will likely get used to opening and closing the front lid.  You could just leave the piano cover on while folding it back, flip the front lid, and raise the music desk. 

Made a Liszt. Need new Handel's for Soler panel & Alkan foil. Will Faure Stein on the way to pick up Mendels' sohn. Josquin get Wolfgangs Schu with Clara. Gone Chopin, I'll be Bach

Offline huaidongxi

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Re: String Cover?
«Reply #5 on: August 09, 2016, 11:46:22 PM »
not a string cover, instead we had a custom (the fabricator already had templates for the well known major models, like our vintage M&H) ordered, heavy, padded cover made that comes in two pieces, with a wide velcro strip along the entire seam where they meet.  the smaller front section terminates exactly where the front lid can be folded back to play with the main section of the lid down.

if we ever don't have a cat (unlikely) and the piano has the entire lid raised more often, we'll invest further in a good string cover.  but the heavy outer cover has done well in keeping the interior clean and buffering everything from temperature and humidity fluctuations (we only occasionally have the heat on during the winter).

Offline piano petals

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Re: String Cover?
«Reply #6 on: August 10, 2016, 02:04:05 AM »

My husband surprised me with a new grand eleven years ago!!! We live in Southwest Florida (high humidity) so our tuner advised us to get a string cover, which we promptly did at a cost of $250. I am very glad that we have it, however I was really upset when I saw what I had received for that sum of money.
Anyone could quite easily cut one to fit from a sturdy piece of felt found at many fabric stores. The edges do not have to be hemmed, as felt does not ravel. We purchased a piece of plastic lattice
that is used in gardening and cut it to fit inside the piano, 1" away from the sides. The felt is glued to the top side of the lattice in several spots. Three wooden "spindles" about 3" tall are glued to various places on the underneath of the lattice, thereby keeping everything off of the strings. It is great for humidity and dust. I only remove it for turnings/cleaning and the sound of the piano is not affected. Our tuner thinks it is amazing. I also have black felt on the desk to protect the finish as I am always moving music books back and forth.