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Advice on possible piano purchase (Read 1180 times)

Offline thomas76

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Advice on possible piano purchase
« on: September 14, 2016, 05:24:05 AM »
Howdy,

I'm new to the forum and hoping to get some advice.
I took some lessons a number of years ago,  but never progressed very far. Now I'm looking to get playing again.

I have a rellatively new (20 or so years) Ellington baby grand that has not been played in about 10 years, but I would have to have it moved nearly 400 miles for which I've been quoted around $1000. In the area where I live, I have found a Packard boudoir grand for $2000in good condition, including moving that seems like a good deal. Also in my area, console uprights are regularly listed for around $500. My home will fit a boudoir grand barely. I'm willing to pay for a good quality instrument. Any words of wisdom on what you would do?

Thanks

Offline indianajo

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Re: Advice on possible piano purchase
«Reply #1 on: September 14, 2016, 06:41:30 PM »
Neither brand is exactly famous.  I don't even know what continent you are on.
The Duke- the famous  Ellington, there was a photograph of him on PBS Jazz program playing a Wurlitzer grand. 
I certainly wouldn't try to own two baby grands.  Actually I like the sound of quality console pianos better than baby grands. In my location this includes Sohmer, Steinway which I own, and in churches around me, pre globalization Baldwins, especially Acrosonic models, Mason & Hamlin, Chickering ,some of the higher end Wurlitzers.  Oddly store brand Grinnell Bros of Detroit has been nice.   
The cost of moving a baby grand is part of the penalty of owning one.  Also with a grand the sound is bounced off the top (when up)  to the right of the room, instead of bouncing off the back wall at the player.  I don't like grands at all with the top down, no highs.  The  first three console models mentioned, have soundboards shaved to thin the highs are let out the back with the top down. 
I've found no speed penalty on the console models I've mentioned versus grands, and I only have one piece I play that could use the middle pedal one note sustain unique to grands. 
and when I need to move a console, a ramp of three 2x8's, three sheets of 1/8"x24'x48" UHMW plastic a u-haul trailer, and away I go, no helper required.   Cost maybe $150 for a local move, if you save the plastic knock off $75 the next move. 
Best of luck. 

Offline huaidongxi

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Re: Advice on possible piano purchase
«Reply #2 on: September 14, 2016, 06:54:14 PM »
the terms 'baby' or 'boudoir' are applied to varying sizes, and are somewhat subjective, imprecise descriptions.  what are the lengths of the two pianos you refer to. does your ten year old Ellington need any work other than tuning, regulation, voicing, and how much did you love playing it when you were more active.  a thousand will not go too far in purchasing a small grand piano -- do you like the Packard more than your Ellington, or is it just the size difference ?

if you aren't really fond of that Ellington, consider looking for a studio size (46-48 in tall) or bigger upright ; decent ones will give you response and sound equivalent, sometimes superior, to mediocre small (5'6 or shorter) grands. if your habitation space has limitations, vertical pianos offer you much more flexibility in placement, obviously.  good luck.

Offline thomas76

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Re: Advice on possible piano purchase
«Reply #3 on: September 16, 2016, 09:10:08 PM »
The Packard is 5'7" and I don't remember the size of the Ellington. From what I've heard, Ellington is anot entry level piano, that may not justify the $1000 moving expense