Piano Forum



Master Teacher Christopher Elton Never Ending Impetus
With 50 years at the Royal Academy of Music and an international teaching career, Professor Christopher Elton has gained unique experience in how to coach accomplished artists. In this unique interview for Piano Street, Elton shares his insights and views on the big perspective. Read more >>

Topic: Can someone explain this notation?  (Read 3891 times)

Offline ranjit

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1423
Can someone explain this notation?
on: January 20, 2017, 10:05:16 AM
I am not able to make sense of some notation in the Schubert Impromptu No.2.
In bars 25 onward, in the bass clef, there is a union (imagine it as dp., representing the note heads), and then a slur followed by another note.
What does this mean? (see picture attached for clarification)
Sign up for a Piano Street membership to download this piano score.
Sign up for FREE! >>

Offline adodd81802

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1114
Re: Can someone explain this notation?
Reply #1 on: January 20, 2017, 10:08:27 AM
You're probably aware, nothing has come through.
"England is a country of pianos, they are everywhere."

Offline brogers70

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1627
Re: Can someone explain this notation?
Reply #2 on: January 20, 2017, 11:12:57 AM
It means that you are to hold the low Eb for the full dotted half and to play the Eb an octave up on the second beat of the measure. Likewise throughout that section. It's easy to do.

If you are wondering why it's written that way, think of other ways of notating it. He could have written a low Eb dotted half, with a quarter rest directly above it followed by a half note Eb an octave up. But that would not convey the smooth connection across the octave jump, which is what he wants. Or he could have written a quarter note low Eb followed by a half note Eb an octave up with a pedal indication that would have kept the lower Eb sounding. But then the triplets above in the right hand would be all smeared together. If you use pedal in these measures it has to be a light, half pedal or less, and that would not keep the low Eb sounding properly on its own.

Hope that helps.

Offline visitor

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 5294
Re: Can someone explain this notation?
Reply #3 on: January 20, 2017, 12:31:09 PM
He image is incomplete to fully analyze and help but from what i see and a fragment of something after, i see two voices converge on a unison, then the tenor moves up and bass stays still. It will help you to think about textures, voices, satb and choral writing and similar, it can frame how you see notation so it is not confusing, i see nothing odd with  the image you posted since therw are two voices in lh and at that moment they happen to do the same thing, then later , they don't.

Offline dcstudio

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2421
Re: Can someone explain this notation?
Reply #4 on: January 20, 2017, 04:13:20 PM
He image is incomplete to fully analyze and help but from what i see and a fragment of something after, i see two voices converge on a unison, then the tenor moves up and bass stays still. It will help you to think about textures, voices, satb and choral writing and similar, it can frame how you see notation so it is not confusing, i see nothing odd with  the image you posted since therw are two voices in lh and at that moment they happen to do the same thing, then later , they don't.

Well said  :) like two people singing the same note and one  moves on while the other continues to hold it.  Pianists regularly have trouble making sense out of this until they get used to it. We aren't ensemble players generally speaking but we can make the piano sound like an ensemble as Schubert masterfully does in this example.

Offline visitor

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 5294
Re: Can someone explain this notation?
Reply #5 on: January 21, 2017, 03:53:16 AM
Well said  :) like two people singing the same note and one  moves on while the other continues to hold it.  Pianists regularly have trouble making sense out of this until they get used to it. We aren't ensemble players generally speaking but we can make the piano sound like an ensemble as Schubert masterfully does in this example.
thanks dcstudio!!, had a teacher tell me more than once we are the conductor amd our fingers are the voices and instruments , with me I feel like they gave an add youth orchestra and it's all I can do to try and get half the members to cooperate more more than a few minutes lol ;)
For more information about this topic, click search below!
 

Logo light pianostreet.com - the website for classical pianists, piano teachers, students and piano music enthusiasts.

Subscribe for unlimited access

Sign up

Follow us

Piano Street Digicert