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Has anyone observed this pattern regarding chords? (Read 1799 times)

Offline ranjit

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Has anyone observed this pattern regarding chords?
« on: February 06, 2017, 01:22:14 PM »
1.Start with any major or minor chord.

2.Take the upper two notes of that chord. There will be exactly one major or minor chord corresponding to it. This will be your next chord.

Keep on repeating this.
You will run through each of the major and minor chords exactly once.

For example, if we start with C major, we get:
C major (C-E-G)
E minor (E-G-B)
G major (G-B-D)
B minor (B-D-F#)
...

Have you observed this pattern?
Is there any name for this?

Offline brogers70

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Re: Has anyone observed this pattern regarding chords?
«Reply #1 on: February 06, 2017, 01:27:54 PM »
If you run that pattern in the opposite direction, C maj, a min, F maj, d min...it's a pattern in which I (and many, many others) run through all my scales. I guess you could call it a circle of thirds, but I've never heard that. It's a way of going round the circle of fifths, but including relative minors along the way.

Offline vaniii

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Re: Has anyone observed this pattern regarding chords?
«Reply #2 on: February 06, 2017, 01:34:24 PM »
If you run that pattern in the opposite direction, C maj, a min, F maj, d min...it's a pattern in which I (and many, many others) run through all my scales. I guess you could call it a circle of thirds, but I've never heard that. It's a way of going round the circle of fifths, but including relative minors along the way.

The name for this is tertiary modulation; Liszt loved it as did many other composers.

The philosophy here is relation by major third, arriving at the relative minor to the dominant, or to the relative minor's tonic major (in this case E major, if you sharpen G).

'ranjit', exploration is vital to understanding, but remember, it is more than likely that you will discover something already discovered.

If you approach a good teacher, they will likely provide suitable explanation to avoid plagiarism.

There is a reason why PhD and DMus students are expected to read thoroughly their entire field, then providing a literature review of up to 10,000 words before they begin research...

.. one, does not reinvent the wheel simply to go to the shops, you use a bike.

PS: see what else you find and report back.

Offline ranjit

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Re: Has anyone observed this pattern regarding chords?
«Reply #3 on: February 06, 2017, 02:05:19 PM »
If you approach a good teacher, they will likely provide suitable explanation to avoid plagiarism.

Yes, but sadly, I don't have access to one. :-\
So, I'm trying to learn as much as I can, on my own.

...exploration is vital to understanding, but remember, it is more than likely that you will discover something already discovered.

I expected that this had been discovered already. That's why I also asked what it was called. When are all these concepts introduced in music theory?

The name for this is tertiary modulation; Liszt loved it as did many other composers.

This suddenly reminded me: Liszt uses this in the Hungarian Rhapsody No.2, right?

This is very interesting. Thanks for replying!

Offline dcstudio

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Re: Has anyone observed this pattern regarding chords?
«Reply #4 on: February 06, 2017, 02:15:16 PM »

When are all these concepts introduced in music theory?



2ND semester theory as I recall...might have been the end of 1St semester.  Right after secondary dominants.