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Author Topic: A beginner student's first lesson  (Read 796 times)
spenstar
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« on: March 01, 2017, 01:27:15 AM »

I'm a high school student who has been playing diligently for 10 years, so I started offering lessons for beginner and intermediate students. I arranged a lesson with a new student, but he is a 9 year old who has ever played. There's so much material to cover for beginners, Andy I'm not sure how much a kid could take in. So if anyone has any tips on the pinpoint of where to start or any tips for teaching children, that would be great!! Thank you Smiley
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themeandvariation
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« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2017, 01:40:33 PM »

You are young. Giving piano lessons comes with a great responsibility.. The student trusts that You know what you are doing.  A lack of understanding of a proper progression and development of learning tools can create much trouble - and snowball as time goes on. 
You mention that you have played for 10 years. Have you had lessons Yourself for 10 years?  Or, how many years? 
If you Do have a teacher, it would be beneficial to schedule one or more lessons with them to discuss solely and In Particular how to proceed in your endeavor, and whether you are ready and responsible to do such.  If you are not willing, or circumstances not permitting, asking such a question here is Not enough to make a responsible decision in and of itself.

Are you planning on charging for this service?
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4'33"
klavieronin
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« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2017, 12:16:45 PM »

Oh boy, I remember when I first started teaching. I thought it would be a piece of cake since I had a music degree and did two semesters of piano pedagogy at university. How wrong was I? It is a steep learning curve and every new student will be different. The best advice I can offer is to avoid teaching notation in the first lesson and instead make sure they can understand fundamental concepts like keeping time (counting in 2s, 3s, and 4s), high and low pitch, keyboard layout, etc. Try to come up with some improvising duets you can play together. For example a like to get new students to play a steady rhythm on the two black keys (C# - D# - C# - D# etc.) while I play a simple chord progression in the bass.

When it comes to teaching there is no substitute for experience though.
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love_that_tune
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« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2017, 06:16:46 PM »

You will find that the student shows you how much they can handle.  I learned by the seat of my pants how to teach under the auspices of a Master teacher.  Not every student has to have ten years of master teaching.  Give it a go with a lesson book series that you enjoy.  If I had a nickel for every student I've taken on who did not enjoy a rigid program, I'd be set for life.

Life has presented you an opportunity.  Go for it.
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