Piano Forum logo
September 25, 2018, 01:16:50 AM *
   Forum Home   Help Search  


The Harpsichord – Old, but Still Relevant

“If you buy only one record of harpsichord music in your life . . . buy this sensational album” wrote Richard Morrison, The Times (London). Although most of us don’t buy records anymore, this recently released album “Time Present and Time Past” could be worth checking out. Read more >>

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: .  (Read 697 times)
maplecleff1215
PS Silver Member
Jr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 35


.
« on: May 29, 2017, 08:58:31 PM »

.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
dogperson
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 927


« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2017, 09:32:19 PM »

Why play only one style?    In my case, TIME!   I have so much left to learn about classical that I don't feel I have time to start jazz piano, and do justice to both classical and jazz....but maybe 'someday'.   Sadly, a day job gets in the way of any diversification. 
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
maplecleff1215
PS Silver Member
Jr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 35


« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2017, 10:17:16 PM »

.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
j_tour
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 257


« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2017, 03:17:15 AM »

No doubt it's unlikely to know everything about every kind of music.

My strong suspicion is that musicianship isn't valued in the typical diet of the American child keyboard player, perhaps because having good ears and being literate in music aren't as neatly presentable at recitals for the parents and so forth.

I'd be interested to know what proportion of concert pianists are able to do basic things, like play simple tunes by ear, while providing sensible harmonizations, solo or with any ad hoc group of other musicians, and understand the basic accompaniment styles for various kinds of popular rhythms.

I suspect any one of the people you hear on records and on stage would do just fine -- it's probably the children and the less-serious pianists who nevertheless may have an impressive technique who fall short.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
outin
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 7665


« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2017, 03:45:02 AM »

Of course there are so many different "styles" in what you call classical that to explore them all is enough for a lifetime.

For a child it makes sense to explore as many different things as possible. And if one plans to make a living in music the more different skills the better  But for an adult amateur who already has general knowledge of musical styles and has formed likes and interests it does not seem that  necessary. And there's also the time issue already mentioned...
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

Pieces under work now: Franck op 18, Bach Sinfonia nr 9 and P&F a minor book 2.
Wait...no Scarlatti? Must add something soon...
ted
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 3469


« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2017, 03:46:11 AM »

Some players have broader taste than others; I do not think people should feel forced to play or listen to anything they do not enjoy. I myself play and listen to a wide variety of idiom, but admittedly most do not, particularly professionals. For some reason I have never understood, aside from the odd exception, far more jazz, ragtime, stride and swing pianists seem able to play classical well than the other way around. The bias appears unilateral.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

"When I was young they said, 'Ah, wait until you are old, then you'll see.' Well, now I am old, and I have seen nothing." - Erik Satie
maplecleff1215
PS Silver Member
Jr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 35


« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2017, 05:55:37 PM »

.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
maplecleff1215
PS Silver Member
Jr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 35


« Reply #7 on: May 30, 2017, 05:57:48 PM »

For some reason I have never understood, aside from the odd exception, far more jazz, ragtime, stride and swing pianists seem able to play classical well than the other way around. The bias appears unilateral.

I don't quite understand that either. I seem to be able to play both classical and jazz just fine. But maybe that's because I'm not being trained in one particular area, nor do I have many years of experience on me.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
visitor
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 4711


« Reply #8 on: May 30, 2017, 07:45:22 PM »

people should learn and play styles to the extent that they enjoy/want proficiency in them and to build the skillset needed to navigate works in that style relative to their need to play them as a means of work/income and career demands.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  


Need more info or help?


Search pianostreet.com - the web's largest resource of information about piano playing:



 
Jump to:  


Most popular classical piano composers:
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

o