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Topic: New Repertoire  (Read 2269 times)

Offline joaosousa

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New Repertoire
on: June 30, 2017, 10:24:48 PM
Hey guys :) it's time for me to choose new repertoire. This year i've worked on these pieces:

Beethoven Sonata Op. 13
Brahms Op. 118 No. 2
Bach Prelude and Fugue in F minor I book
Scriabin Etude Op. 8 No. 5
Chopin Etude Op. 10 No. 12
A portuguese piece called: Fiandeira By Luiz Costa

I have also played Debussy's La catedral engloutie, Gershwin's 1st prelude, etc.

I need your help with suggestions on the following:
- a classical sonata like Haydn's B minor (Hob.XVI:32) or Mozart's F major (K.332).
- 2 interesting etudes . I love Rachmaninoff's Op. 33 and 39 but some seem impossible for the moment, Scriabin's are beautifull too, I am not looking for Chopin's.
- a piece. I am considering Ravel's sonatine or Debussy's Les Collines D'Anacapri. I want something impressionist but the impressionist pieces are really demanding in 2 ways: technic and the interpretation part . i am afraid i can't do both at this point.

My goal this year (last year before college) is to refine my touché that's why i am looking for a classical sonata. I am not really that classical ;)

Sorry for eventual mistakes on my writing and thanks in advance.

Offline visitor

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Re: New Repertoire
Reply #1 on: July 01, 2017, 03:24:31 AM

This etude is on my etude list aND also occupies a third place spot on next Medtner piece to study , I don't know know why more people don't study it, it has crazy beatiful spots and of course it's Medtner, there is magic and smart piano writing in such a small short package.

Offline piulento

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Re: New Repertoire
Reply #2 on: July 01, 2017, 09:38:50 AM
Here's what I have to say:
- Mozart's k. 332 is super fun to play, and helps improving many different aspects of playing. Never played the Haydn, but it's really nice too.
- Prokofiev's and Debussy's etudes are AMAZING, but they might be a bit too difficult (for me too haha). Try looking at the sheet music anyway. Some of Rach's etudes are simpler than the others. There's a beautiful one in C minor (can't remember the number) which isn't too difficult, but still isn't easy.
- Ravel is a tough bastard. He has very few technically approachable pieces. Debussy has some beautiful preludes that aren't that technically difficult, but can really help you with your touch (I recently worked on 'bruyeres' and 'la terrasse des audiences du clair de lune' - some of the most pieces I worked on this year. You can also take a look at some of the images - maybe 'hommage a rameau' or 'reflets dans l'eau'.

Anyway, have fun  ;D

Offline joaosousa

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Re: New Repertoire
Reply #3 on: July 01, 2017, 09:47:02 PM

This etude is on my etude list aND also occupies a third place spot on next Medtner piece to study , I don't know know why more people don't study it, it has crazy beatiful spots and of course it's Medtner, there is magic and smart piano writing in such a small short package.

It says the videos isn't available :(

Offline joaosousa

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Re: New Repertoire
Reply #4 on: July 01, 2017, 09:49:17 PM
Here's what I have to say:
- Mozart's k. 332 is super fun to play, and helps improving many different aspects of playing. Never played the Haydn, but it's really nice too.
- Prokofiev's and Debussy's etudes are AMAZING, but they might be a bit too difficult (for me too haha). Try looking at the sheet music anyway. Some of Rach's etudes are simpler than the others. There's a beautiful one in C minor (can't remember the number) which isn't too difficult, but still isn't easy.
- Ravel is a tough bastard. He has very few technically approachable pieces. Debussy has some beautiful preludes that aren't that technically difficult, but can really help you with your touch (I recently worked on 'bruyeres' and 'la terrasse des audiences du clair de lune' - some of the most pieces I worked on this year. You can also take a look at some of the images - maybe 'hommage a rameau' or 'reflets dans l'eau'.

Anyway, have fun  ;D

Although i love Prokofiev I don't like his etudes :P i will play a prelude by Debussy that's why i won't pick up any etude by him. I think I'll go for Rach Op. 33 no 6 or 7.
I am thinking of Las Collines D'Anacapri by debussy :D or do the suite bergamasque.
What do you guys think on Chopin's Op. 44 Polonaise ?

Offline chopinawesome

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Re: New Repertoire
Reply #5 on: July 01, 2017, 10:15:55 PM

What do you guys think on Chopin's Op. 44 Polonaise ?
I have had a bad experience with that piece :-[
Anyways, here is IMO what you should play:

1.BACH!!!!!!
   Bach has a lot of great stuff out there. Personally, I don't really find his WTC too interesting. They don't grab me like his other stuff do. English Suites, Partitas, or Toccatas are great pieces to play. I would personally start off with the 2nd English Suite in a minor BWV 807 and then play some Partitas and Toccatas and then finish off with the 6th English Suite.

2.Sonatas
  
   Beethoven: Beethoven wrote some very beautiful sonatas. If you haven't played him yet, you should probably start with the Op.49 ones. Then go one to Op.14. After that, you can really try any one of the first 18 ones. My personal favorite ones are:
Op.2/3 ,10/1,10/2,10/3, 7(though it is hard), 27/1, 28, op.31/3(kind of difficult too)

   Mozart: All of them are approachable(except for K.576,310,533). Though k.332 is really nice, I prefer K.284 in D Major( it is not as difficult as people say it is) and k.333( I found it very difficult, but most people disagree).

   Haydn: b minor Hob.XVI:32 is a safe way to go. So is Hob.XVI 36. However, my favorites are the last 2 e flat major ones(Hob.XVI 49, Hob.XVI 52).
  
  3.Etudes
          If you can handle Op.10/12, you can probably do Rach 33/2 in C Major, a beautiful work. The 2nd etude could be something like Liszt's Op.1 no4, in contrast to the Rachmaninoff.

4.Impressionist
        Debussy: Suite Bergamasque is a great choice for your level and a transition to Estampes, harder Preludes, Pour le Piano, etc. All 4 movements are really beautiful and exciting, especially no.4 Passepied. If you want to do a Prelude, you should probably stick to Footsteps in the Snow(my favorite in Book 1), Dance of Delphi, or Bruyeres. The Hills of Anacapri is a very advanced piece IMO and I found it to be just as difficult as the thirds prelude.

        Ravel: Sonatine is very beautiful and you can do a very good job on it. Valses Nobles et Sentimentales would be my second pick, as it isn't too difficult but is pretty nice. My last recommendation would be Prelude from Le Tombeau de Couperin. It is a fun piece but it is pretty hard.

5. I know you didn't ask for this, but you should probably play something romantic. I have 2 suggestions, the Waltz in A flat Major Op.42 by Chopin and the Arabesque in C Major Op.18 by Schumann. And F sharp minor Polonaise is VERY DIFFICULT. It requires an amazing amount of stamina and I am having an easier time playing Scherzo nos.1,2, and even 4. You should probably play other Polonaises first, like Op.26 and 40. I would also play Op.53 first. IMO, it is a lot more straightforward than Op.44. Op.44 is also really awkward to play.  No to mention that you have memorize 18 pages of music( the mazurka is hard to memorize).
In conclusion, here are my recommendations:

1.You should do some Bach like English Suite no.2 or french suite no.5.
2.Sonata: Beethoven, Mozart K.333,284, Haydn Hob.XVI 32, 26,49,52
3.Etudes: Rach 33/2, Liszt Op.1/4
5.Debussy Suite Bergamasque, Easier preludes, Ravel Sontine, Valses Nobles et Sentimentales
4. A romantic work like chopin waltz op.42 and schumann arabeske, NOT CHOPIN OP.44
Beethoven Op 2/2
Chopin Op 20, maybe op 47/38
Debussy Etude 7
Grieg Op 16
Want to do:
Chopin Concerti 1 and 2
Beethoven Waldstein
Ravel Miroirs

Offline joaosousa

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Re: New Repertoire
Reply #6 on: July 01, 2017, 10:41:12 PM
I have had a bad experience with that piece :-[
Anyways, here is IMO what you should play:

1.BACH!!!!!!
   Bach has a lot of great stuff out there. Personally, I don't really find his WTC too interesting. They don't grab me like his other stuff do. English Suites, Partitas, or Toccatas are great pieces to play. I would personally start off with the 2nd English Suite in a minor BWV 807 and then play some Partitas and Toccatas and then finish off with the 6th English Suite.

2.Sonatas
  
   Beethoven: Beethoven wrote some very beautiful sonatas. If you haven't played him yet, you should probably start with the Op.49 ones. Then go one to Op.14. After that, you can really try any one of the first 18 ones. My personal favorite ones are:
Op.2/3 ,10/1,10/2,10/3, 7(though it is hard), 27/1, 28, op.31/3(kind of difficult too)

   Mozart: All of them are approachable(except for K.576,310,533). Though k.332 is really nice, I prefer K.284 in D Major( it is not as difficult as people say it is) and k.333( I found it very difficult, but most people disagree).

   Haydn: b minor Hob.XVI:32 is a safe way to go. So is Hob.XVI 36. However, my favorites are the last 2 e flat major ones(Hob.XVI 49, Hob.XVI 52).
  
  3.Etudes
          If you can handle Op.10/12, you can probably do Rach 33/2 in C Major, a beautiful work. The 2nd etude could be something like Liszt's Op.1 no4, in contrast to the Rachmaninoff.

4.Impressionist
        Debussy: Suite Bergamasque is a great choice for your level and a transition to Estampes, harder Preludes, Pour le Piano, etc. All 4 movements are really beautiful and exciting, especially no.4 Passepied. If you want to do a Prelude, you should probably stick to Footsteps in the Snow(my favorite in Book 1), Dance of Delphi, or Bruyeres. The Hills of Anacapri is a very advanced piece IMO and I found it to be just as difficult as the thirds prelude.

        Ravel: Sonatine is very beautiful and you can do a very good job on it. Valses Nobles et Sentimentales would be my second pick, as it isn't too difficult but is pretty nice. My last recommendation would be Prelude from Le Tombeau de Couperin. It is a fun piece but it is pretty hard.

5. I know you didn't ask for this, but you should probably play something romantic. I have 2 suggestions, the Waltz in A flat Major Op.42 by Chopin and the Arabesque in C Major Op.18 by Schumann. And F sharp minor Polonaise is VERY DIFFICULT. It requires an amazing amount of stamina and I am having an easier time playing Scherzo nos.1,2, and even 4. You should probably play other Polonaises first, like Op.26 and 40. I would also play Op.53 first. IMO, it is a lot more straightforward than Op.44. Op.44 is also really awkward to play.  No to mention that you have memorize 18 pages of music( the mazurka is hard to memorize).
In conclusion, here are my recommendations:

1.You should do some Bach like English Suite no.2 or french suite no.5.
2.Sonata: Beethoven, Mozart K.333,284, Haydn Hob.XVI 32, 26,49,52
3.Etudes: Rach 33/2, Liszt Op.1/4
5.Debussy Suite Bergamasque, Easier preludes, Ravel Sontine, Valses Nobles et Sentimentales
4. A romantic work like chopin waltz op.42 and schumann arabeske, NOT CHOPIN OP.44

I will play Bach :) but i dont need help chosing . I will play the b major prelude and fugue from the 1st book. I'd love to play a suite but at this point its not my focus.

For the sonata i think i will go for the e minor from haydn Hob.XVI 34 :) As i have played a Beethoven (Op. 13) and Mozart sonata already

I am considering Scriabin op 8 no 12/4 and Rach op 33 no 6/7.

I know it is but i need a big piece as i am going to college :) either a difficult debussy or a difficult chopin. You would play the Op. 53 first ? :O

The thing is that the op 44 fits my qualities :) i am considering Prokofievs Suggestion Diabolique too




Offline chopinawesome

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Re: New Repertoire
Reply #7 on: July 02, 2017, 01:02:41 AM
In my opinion, the easiest big Chopin work is his b minor scherzo op.20. Debussy probably Suite Bergamasque or Pour le Piano.

And since you are going to college, you probably also need harder works :-\
No offense, but Haydn Hob.XVI 34 wouldn't do you too well at a college audition. Something like  Hob.XVI 49 would work very well. Diabolical Suggestion is a very fun piece ;D Yes, I would have played Op.53 before 44. It is more pianistic and it is much easier IMO. The Op.44 is musically draining and requires a very mature artist. Not to mention that you have to play octave passages for like 6 minutes  while in Op.53, you play slower octaves. The E major section isn't that difficult either. You just have to roll your wrist accordingly.

About the Prelude and Fugue , is it required? Did you already start it? Because if you didn't, playing nos.3 and 4 from book 2 will give you more success at the audition and college.
Beethoven Op 2/2
Chopin Op 20, maybe op 47/38
Debussy Etude 7
Grieg Op 16
Want to do:
Chopin Concerti 1 and 2
Beethoven Waldstein
Ravel Miroirs

Offline joaosousa

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Re: New Repertoire
Reply #8 on: July 02, 2017, 01:06:08 AM
In my opinion, the easiest big Chopin work is his b minor scherzo op.20.

I am aware of that but I am not looking for the scherzos :P

Offline chopinawesome

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Re: New Repertoire
Reply #9 on: July 02, 2017, 01:12:47 AM
Ok, got it ;)
Beethoven Op 2/2
Chopin Op 20, maybe op 47/38
Debussy Etude 7
Grieg Op 16
Want to do:
Chopin Concerti 1 and 2
Beethoven Waldstein
Ravel Miroirs

Offline joaosousa

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Re: New Repertoire
Reply #10 on: July 02, 2017, 01:18:09 AM
Ok, got it ;)

Thanks anyway :) but I think that playing a scherzo and an rachmaninoff etude is not that contrasting because in both you have fast passages and lyrical parts. Whereas the polonaises are really about the stamina and rhythm and the ballades have a little bit of everything.

Offline joaosousa

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Re: New Repertoire
Reply #11 on: July 02, 2017, 01:21:39 AM
In my opinion, the easiest big Chopin work is his b minor scherzo op.20. Debussy probably Suite Bergamasque or Pour le Piano.

And since you are going to college, you probably also need harder works :-\
No offense, but Haydn Hob.XVI 34 wouldn't do you too well at a college audition. Something like  Hob.XVI 49 would work very well. Diabolical Suggestion is a very fun piece ;D Yes, I would have played Op.53 before 44. It is more pianistic and it is much easier IMO. The Op.44 is musically draining and requires a very mature artist. Not to mention that you have to play octave passages for like 6 minutes  while in Op.53, you play slower octaves. The E major section isn't that difficult either. You just have to roll your wrist accordingly.

About the Prelude and Fugue , is it required? Did you already start it? Because if you didn't, playing nos.3 and 4 from book 2 will give you more success at the audition and college.

Well. Here in Portugal colleges value classical sonata a lot. Playing a perfect Mozart is way more valued than a good pathetic. Also I don't need to have the same difficulty level on all pieces. Ones may show elegance, others technic, others passion and others just lyrical phrasing.

Offline joaosousa

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Re: New Repertoire
Reply #12 on: July 02, 2017, 01:25:08 AM
In my opinion, the easiest big Chopin work is his b minor scherzo op.20. Debussy probably Suite Bergamasque or Pour le Piano.

And since you are going to college, you probably also need harder works :-\
No offense, but Haydn Hob.XVI 34 wouldn't do you too well at a college audition. Something like  Hob.XVI 49 would work very well. Diabolical Suggestion is a very fun piece ;D Yes, I would have played Op.53 before 44. It is more pianistic and it is much easier IMO. The Op.44 is musically draining and requires a very mature artist. Not to mention that you have to play octave passages for like 6 minutes  while in Op.53, you play slower octaves. The E major section isn't that difficult either. You just have to roll your wrist accordingly.

About the Prelude and Fugue , is it required? Did you already start it? Because if you didn't, playing nos.3 and 4 from book 2 will give you more success at the audition and college.

The prelude and fugue is not a requirement. A polyphonic piece by Bach is. But it is normal for people to play preludes and fugues because competitions have them on the required repertoire and they are generally fast learning pieces but with a huge level of maturing. You can learn it fast but you take a long time to master it. For this reason they are the best option.

Offline chopinawesome

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Re: New Repertoire
Reply #13 on: July 02, 2017, 01:29:05 AM
Ok.
Good luck at your audition ;D
Thx for informing about the prelude and fugues. I have barely learned any, compared to how much suites and other pieces I learned. I only learned 3 and 12 from Bk.1 and 3 and 4 from BK.II.
Beethoven Op 2/2
Chopin Op 20, maybe op 47/38
Debussy Etude 7
Grieg Op 16
Want to do:
Chopin Concerti 1 and 2
Beethoven Waldstein
Ravel Miroirs

Offline joaosousa

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Re: New Repertoire
Reply #14 on: July 02, 2017, 01:40:57 AM
Ok.
Good luck at your audition ;D
Thx for informing about the prelude and fugues. I have barely learned any, compared to how much suites and other pieces I learned. I only learned 3 and 12 from Bk.1 and 3 and 4 from BK.II.

I have also played the 12 of the 1st book :) it is easy to get through but to master it.... It's quite hard. The fugue specially. For one to play the subject and counter subjects with the same technic (legato or staccato) from the beginning to the end requires a lot of study :P
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