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Master Pianist Jorge Bolet Rehearsing and Teaching Rachmaninov

See and hear Jorge Bolet and Conductor Paavo Berglund in a preliminary rehearsal prior to a full rehearsal with the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra in a performance of the Rachmaninov 2nd Piano Concerto. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Schenkerian Analysis  (Read 292 times)
david456103
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« on: July 10, 2017, 04:48:10 AM »

[Not sure if this is the right forum to post this question in, so moderators please move it to the correct one if it's not --- thanks!]

Are there any other "schools" of musical analysis either similar or different to Schenkerian? I haven't been able to find any, so I'm hoping all you music theory experts might be able to help out, thanks! Smiley
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georgey
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« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2017, 05:13:22 AM »

Howard Hanson?  I remember doing some Hanson harmonic analysis some 30+ years ago.
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georgey
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« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2017, 06:18:48 AM »

Some of this looks familiar

http://www.u.arizona.edu/~gross/Howard.Hanson_bw.pdf
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georgey
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« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2017, 06:54:34 PM »

If I remember, Hanson harmonic analysis is more geared toward modern music (20th+ century), including both tonal and atonal.  We also used Jan LaRue’s “Guidelines for Style Analysis” which is a more relaxed, easier to comprehend method covering all aspects of music, new and old.  I am not familiar with Schenkarian analysis, although I took a quick look in Wikipedia.

https://www.thefreelibrary.com/Guidelines+for+Style+Analysis%2C+2d+ed.-a016087944

EDIT: " LaRue believes Schenkerian analysis can well be incorporated within his approach and an example will be furnished in Models. "
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keypeg
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« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2017, 10:51:55 PM »

I don't know if it's a system - but a while back while exchanging ideas, someone teaching theory who had graduated in recent years told me about "Neo Riemannian".
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anamnesis
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« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2017, 11:31:08 PM »

I don't know if it's a system - but a while back while exchanging ideas, someone teaching theory who had graduated in recent years told me about "Neo Riemannian".

It is. In Neo-Riemannian theory, the chord is the fundamental organizing structure in music.  Musical operations are done on triads via exchanges with related chords (ones with common tones) to create motion.

In Schenkerian and its derived approaches, lines are the organizing force and are where direct musical operations take place. Operations are based on the concept of filling, not filling, or opening up consonant spaces. Chords are epiphenomenal, and the only real notable ones are when there is a conspiracy between lines such that they are aligned in a certain way.   
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