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November 23, 2017, 10:20:57 PM *
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Why is Debussy’s Clair de lune the most downloaded piece?

A challenge for both the intermediate pianist and the professional, Debussy’s Clair de lune seems to contain specific qualities which both instrumentalists and listeners find attractive. The piece, which is a part of the composer’s Suite Bergamasque, is the most downloaded piano score in Piano Street’s sheet music library. Why? Read more >>

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Author Topic: Teaching Twins and Mother  (Read 210 times)
ameliatan
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« on: August 31, 2017, 04:39:40 AM »

Dear Teachers - I am sorry, but this continues from my previous post 'Teaching Friends'. My friend has twin boys, aged 11 (beginners at same level) who were on Suzuki method for 4 months. I saw her video clips, and even how they were taught. No reading at all. Just copying the teacher, and saying finger numbers but they played nice tunes. Anyway, I told her frankly that I would need to teach them note reading by letters.
She seems interested in attending my lessons, and learn piano. I feel it’s a good sign as she wants to be involved so she knows what the journey is like. So I guess she wants to sit in, even play with them (duets).
I am not sure how to structure the lessons for maximum progress. Should I teach them separately? Or have them in 1 class which can be fun for duets or trios. At the same time, I don’t want her kids to feel uncomfortable with her being around. However, I see it as a nice way for her to bond with her kids (at home playing & in lessons) but at the same time, might turn out to be a disaster Sad Any ideas or advice is much appreciated. This is new to me. I have never taught twins (same level) and whose mother wants to be included. I am so used to teaching each child individually.
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tillyfloss
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« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2017, 12:55:11 PM »

I teach lots of siblings back to back with each sitting in on the other's lesson. That way each child can have my individual attention and make progress in their own way and time, but I can also spend  a few minutes of each lesson -end of the first and beginning of the second- teaching them duets etc. It works well for me.

I usually don't mind parents sitting in, unless I think it's impacting the lesson negatively; and then I ask them to sit outside the teaching room.

It could be the Mother just wants to be able to support her childrens' learning, which would be excellent. I believe the Suzuki method is designed to involve the parent and that might be how she expects to continue.

However, if she wants to learn for her own sake, then I'd suggest that has a completely separate  lesson.

You could also make the back to back lessons a group lesson once a month or so, if you think that might be fun and beneficial to all parties.

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