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Author Topic: weinberg piano model su-121 mp  (Read 182 times)
thomas82
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« on: September 13, 2017, 03:54:11 AM »

Hi recently i got myself a used piano weinberg piano model su-121 mp.
I am quite curious the origin of this piano model.

Anyone has any idea?
Is it an excellent piano?
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indianajo
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« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2017, 03:00:25 PM »

What continent are you on?
Here is a text about various types of pianos and some guide of value.
http://www.bluebookofpianos.com/pianoall.htm
There is a list online of brands town of origin and manufacture dates, but I can't find it readily.
that name sounds generic. I've not heard of it in the midwest, US.   Look on the back or bottom for some indication of where it was made.
As far as intrinsic value, check how fast you can go on one note with two hands. 168 bpm is very good.  check how soft you can go on every note. If they sound very soft and even between all the notes, that is very good.  If the tones match between three string, two string, one string notes, that is good.  check the tone against pianos in concert halls & churches. Does it sound like the better ones?  If so that is good.  Notice many people have damaged ears these days and can't tell the difference between good tone and bad, due to no high frequency response.
Some totally forgotten pianos are good values even if the resale value is zero. Perhaps they are too expensive to move because of excessive weight.   Many highly respected pianos sold in stores new have *****y tone IMHO. Many fail the tests above.   Even if the resale value is $$$$.   Most customers are deaf, and buy pianos as furniture for the appearance, not as instruments for the tone and performance. 
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thomas82
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« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2017, 01:25:09 AM »

I live in Singapore and I bought it during a warehouse sale.
It seems to be a German brand but make in Korea.
I found a German Weinberg piano website but cannot find the model
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indianajo
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« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2017, 02:28:19 PM »

With a new piano, if it passes the above tests, another dimension is how stable is the action.
A relative's Lion's head piano, while quite attractive 20 years ago, now has sticky and inconsistent action.  An american piano company whose factory was 20 miles from me until closed in the eighties, succeeded in selling thousands of units that worked fine for a few years or few thousand hours, only.  Asian pianos have to pass the barrier IMHO of being made of non-traditional woods.  Y******  has made it, the consoles sound just as bad after 20 years of hard use as the day they were sold.  But they continue to work well.  The full length Y***** grands sound excellent.
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