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No Great Music Without Great Tension

Anthony Tommassini, classical music critic for The New York Times, invites us all to a mini-lecture at the piano on dissonance. With a series of examples by well known composers, Tommassini elaborates on one of the most crucial components in Western music. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Schumann sonata 2  (Read 109 times)
expressman70
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« on: October 05, 2017, 02:49:22 PM »

Greetings,

I was wondering if anyone played the piece, and could you comment on the accesibility of this piece. I am wondering because although the piece seems quite busy, It seems like the the textures are comfortable for the hand. Could anyone comment on this aspect.

I am not interested about the technical aspect, or the speed. Just the hand and the naturalness of the textures.


Thank you in advance.

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tnan123
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« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2017, 04:15:14 PM »

Just to clarify you mean Schumann's Sonata Op. 22 in G minor no? Yes, I've played it or at least attempted it a few years ago. I never really got the piece up to tempo and dropped it when something else caught my eye. I wasn't working with a teacher at that point. I intend to revisit it again though. Take my thoughts with a grain of salt.

Yes I found piece actually quite comfortable in the hands with the following caveats: The first movement at tempo and the last movement are not. The first movement feels quite natural. There were only a handful of few jumps and difficult measures I would consider awkward. The issue is getting a clear articulation and sound and maintaining the tempo that I want to play for the first movement. So yes, I can say the textures were natural at a certain tempo, but then it's obviously gonna change as you speed up. For that reason, I know you said you weren't interested in speed or technical aspects, but the technical aspects do to speak to the accessibility of the piece. It will be different for you depending on what speed you want to play as well as the threshold you personally face when speeding up a piece.

The second movement and scherzo were much more manageable for me. The presto final section at the end is where I felt very awkward and never really could get it under my fingers. I worked with the original presto section. There is actuallly 2 versions of it. I was at the point of already dropping the piece though so I really never gave the 2nd version a shot.
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