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Author Topic: Learning Pieces  (Read 216 times)
didi100
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« on: October 28, 2017, 01:27:47 PM »

I know its different for every student, but this question is for more advanced students.
How long does it take to learn a movement from Waldstein or Appassionata with proficiency? Its taking me months to learn each movement and its still not with the proficiency that I want. Maybe I am out of my league with these pieces.
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keypeg
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« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2017, 07:42:33 PM »

What process are you using to learn them?  Are you receiving guidance?
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didi100
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« Reply #2 on: October 28, 2017, 08:21:29 PM »

I have been working with an instructor.
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quantum
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« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2017, 05:53:27 PM »

I think that with these level pieces there are different levels so to speak.  Of the publicly presentable  levels, one of the first would be able to get through the entire piece playing for a group of peers or a masterclass with your teacher's students.  It doesn't have to be completely polished yet to do this, as the main goal is to bring yourself to a mindset to where you can play through a piece no matter what happens.  Are you prepared to land the plane successfully in the event of an engine failure?

It is often after this initial performance, than one becomes comfortable working on refinement as one knows one can get through the piece beginning to end.  

I studied Appasionata while in university, so there was a "deadline" as it eventually had to be played for a jury.  My teacher held frequent masterclasses and encouraged everyone to present their work-in-progrees, even if they felt they were not ready.  Scary, but very rewarding.  After all those masterclasses in front of my peers, the music felt much more secure for the jury.  

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What previous Beethoven sonatas have you studied? How long did it take you to learn them?
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Made a Liszt. Need new Handel's for Soler panel & Alkan foil. Will Faure Stein on the way to pick up Mendels' sohn. Josquin get Wolfgangs Schu with Clara. Gone Chopin, I'll be Bach
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