Piano Forum logo
November 19, 2017, 04:49:53 AM *
   Forum Home   Help Search  


The Great Arthur Rubinstein Revisited

For decades people who were fortunate enough to see and hear esteemed pianist Artur Rubinstein (1887-1982) perform left concert halls spellbound. Biographer and music historian Sachs first heard Rubinstein play in 1959, but it was not until 1986 that he seriously considered writing a biography of Rubinstein. Read more >>

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: How to b e a concer tpianist -- learning versus doing, Dave Thomas  (Read 128 times)
Bob
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 14854


« on: November 05, 2017, 08:17:44 PM »

Well duh, here it is.  I guess we missed this informative video the whole time.   Haha.  Roll Eyes

Watching it now, but I'm not expecting much.






How to be a concert pianist - Learning versus doing | Dave Thomas | TEDxEastsidePrep
8,947 views

119

6

SHARE


 
TEDx Talks
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

Favorite new teacher quote -- "You found the only possible wrong answer."
Bob
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 14854


« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2017, 08:46:34 PM »

Caught my attention a little more.  Basic performance ideas if nothing else.

https://youtu.be/Xu1g6YL3AGE
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

Favorite new teacher quote -- "You found the only possible wrong answer."
Bob
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 14854


« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2017, 09:55:40 PM »

Also a bit interesting.
https://youtu.be/IdJbJMUFzZA

Lots of people looking at you (on stage)... because you're prey.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

Favorite new teacher quote -- "You found the only possible wrong answer."
keypeg
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 2882


« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2017, 02:20:15 AM »

That's 55 minutes of videos to watch, without having any idea what they are about before watching.  I've seen the first one before.  The second, I skipped forward a lot.  What I caught was:
- work backward from the end (learned that already; useful)
- know the structure of your piece (if you don't know this, you should)
- dunnno what the improvising one's way out of Ah que dirais-je maman, renamed Twinkle, was meant to teach, because I didn't have time to go through the video.
I didn't watch the 2nd one.

The first one with the title about becoming a concert pianist: He is a computer programmer, says he teaches (programming?), no idea whether he plays piano. As he presents the findings of the commissioned researchers (why didn't they ask the pilots and those training them?  they would have had first-hand insights), it rests on assumptions about how people learn: first being told what to do, finally moving on to global pictures and intuition.  This is a very narrow view, as there are various ways of learning.  For one thing, there are global learners who are non-linear.  Despite the attention-grabbing title, it has nothing to do with becoming a concert pianist, or a pianist.  I also suspect that the conclusion is wrong, namely that concert pianists do their thing without thinking.  Yes and no to that.  The musicians I talked to, and teachers who teach at that level, all talk of putting thought and study into what you do, and that this doesn't stop.

Bob, can you mention a few of the things in these videos that you have found useful or noteworthy?  55 minutes is a lot of time to spend.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  


Need more info or help?


Search pianostreet.com - the web's largest resource of information about piano playing:



 
Jump to:  


Most popular classical piano composers:
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

o