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Piano Technique – the Leschetizky Method

This legendary manual in both English and German documents principles and techniques of the legendary piano teacher Theodor Leschetizky, who taught Paderewski, Schnabel and many other great pianists. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Liszt's B minor sonata recordings  (Read 231 times)
mjames
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« on: November 09, 2017, 01:39:56 AM »

I have recently fallen in love with this sonata (and Liszt) and my favorite performance thus far is Zimmerman's:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IeKMMDxrsBE&t=1648s

Guys know any other top notch performances you're fond of?  Grin Grin

(This sonata is so rad btw, I can't stop listening to it!!!)
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georgey
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« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2017, 01:53:07 AM »

Van Cliburn

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z4kS3QFVXcI

Edit: Not as good as Zimerman but this is what I listened to as a kid many years ago.   
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pencilart3
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« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2017, 02:18:44 AM »

David Fray! You will not believe his superb touch and voicing, particularly at the lyrical sections such as 12:35. Also the sound quality is beautiful.

Another comment on this performance. At 27:34 he actually plays the accents in the correct hand (the octaves rather than the chords). Listen to, for example, Laplante, who puts the accents in the 4-note chords, probably because they are easier to accentuate. The accentuation throughout Fray's performance is unbelievably precise!



I am also a huge fan of Zimerman's interpretation Smiley
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cimirro
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« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2017, 05:10:14 AM »

Dear mjames,
If I'm not mistaken, you already heard my recording, anyway, I hope you do not mind if I post it again here, since not necessarily all the others here have heard it, and the idea of my interpretation was to follow the "Scientific System of Interpretation" - going back to the original view of the piece as Liszt's composed it from late 1840's to its premiere in 1857 - using the manuscript and first edition, and I also discussed about the "building of the tradition" on the playing of this Sonata specially after Arthur Friedheim's score (made on Joseffy's edition) and his piano roll recording in my master-class I posted (below).

The result proved Liszt's coherence of ideas for this Sonata and the master-class explains the traditional deviation of interpreters according the score (URTEXT, first, or MS).

So here is the Sonata recording:


and the master-class about it for the interested ones  
http://opusdissonus.com.br/master-class_002_cimirro-liszt-sonata.mp3

All the best
Artur
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mjames
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« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2017, 03:47:11 AM »

The Cliburn was freaking great, will listen to Fray's recording tomorrow.
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torandrekongelf
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« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2017, 12:47:54 PM »

Ive only heard Yuja Wang and Argerich. And I prefer Argerichs over Wangs because it has more rawness and power. Smiley

Question: Which would be most difficult? B minor sonata or the Dante-Sonata?
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roshankakiya123
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« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2017, 07:47:09 PM »


Sviatoslav Richter's ability to sustain a stable rhythm without using too much rubato, use of phrasing to keep the flow of the piece smooth and its structure intact, ability to maintain clarity by not using the sustain pedal excessively, lyricism, restraint, seemingly effortless execution and, most of all, passion make his interpretation very refined and convincing:




Here is Horowitz's live performance recorded in 1978:



Electrifying, sensitive and soulful.
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joseffy
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« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2017, 04:33:55 PM »

My favorite was Horowitz 1932 studio recording, but recently I've heard his 1949 live version, which is even better !
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roshankakiya123
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« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2017, 05:59:26 PM »

.
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mjames
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« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2017, 11:18:46 PM »

Man I don't know why it took so long for me to completely fall in love with Liszt's music. He's so awesome, it's not just his sonata either but etudes too, ugh!!!!
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pencilart3
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« Reply #10 on: November 17, 2017, 01:43:36 AM »

Very true, but not just those. The Annees de Pelerinage are some of his finest and the consolations are beautiful.
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