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New Way to play Solid 10ths and 11ths for small hands (Read 1595 times)

Offline maxim3

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New Way to play Solid 10ths and 11ths for small hands
« on: March 28, 2019, 02:22:40 AM »
This new thing looks promising:

https://cutlerkeys.com/

(See the video of pianist, who cannot ordinarily do the harder major 10ths, play St. James Infirmary -- "Dr. John style, full of solid 10ths"

Offline outin

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Re: New Way to play Solid 10ths and 11ths for small hands
«Reply #1 on: March 28, 2019, 04:48:02 AM »
This new thing looks promising:

https://cutlerkeys.com/

(See the video of pianist, who cannot ordinarily do the harder major 10ths, play St. James Infirmary -- "Dr. John style, full of solid 10ths"

Interesting...something like this could actually solve my RH octave problem. I was thinking of a finger extension but if the piano can be improved a little it's even better...

Offline keypeg

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Re: New Way to play Solid 10ths and 11ths for small hands
«Reply #2 on: March 28, 2019, 04:56:15 AM »
Two observations:
1) the range is narrow, something like the middle two octaves
2) every single chord seems to be "white key" chords.  What if you get something like an F# chord which is all black keys?

Offline ted

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Re: New Way to play Solid 10ths and 11ths for small hands
«Reply #3 on: March 28, 2019, 05:18:15 AM »
I couldn't be bothered learning something like that, tenths don't matter enough to me to warrant the effort. I can play them but do so hardly anywhere except in stride solos, for example Waller, where I usually break them off metre anyway because it sounds much more interesting.
"We're all bums when the wagon comes." - Waller

Offline outin

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Re: New Way to play Solid 10ths and 11ths for small hands
«Reply #4 on: March 28, 2019, 05:55:29 AM »
Two observations:
1) the range is narrow, something like the middle two octaves
2) every single chord seems to be "white key" chords.  What if you get something like an F# chord which is all black keys?

1. True, but I think that is the area one mostly plays so it would still be a great help for someone like me.
2. For me not relevant, since I only have problems with white key octaves.

I only wonder if my thumb is long enough to actually use that efficiently...

Offline keypeg

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Re: New Way to play Solid 10ths and 11ths for small hands
«Reply #5 on: March 28, 2019, 03:13:02 PM »
I'm playing a piece right now that has 10ths, it's all over the keyboard, and it's got lots of black keys.  So that came to mind immediately.  There are bits of broken chords in between.  That device forces you to have your hand out near the edge of the white keys, while the black keys are further in.

Offline maxim3

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Re: New Way to play Solid 10ths and 11ths for small hands
«Reply #6 on: March 28, 2019, 08:19:33 PM »
CutlerKeys is in a very early stage of development.

How many of you remember Windows 3.1?

What will CutlerKeys look like in three years?

In the meantime, I strongly suspect that some of you don't fully understand what you are seeing, but that is the fault of the appallingly badly designed website. It looks attractive and professional at first, but it is actually a hideous botch, at least in terms of being able to find all its available information. The man needs a million-dollar grant and additional staff.

Offline timothy42b

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Re: New Way to play Solid 10ths and 11ths for small hands
«Reply #7 on: April 06, 2019, 01:29:23 PM »
The real answer is Wicki-Hayden.





https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wicki-Hayden_note_layout

The audio on those clips is horrendous but there actually is some promise to this system, just like Dvorak has some theoretical advantages over qwerty. 
Tim