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Topic: Emperor Concerto Beethoven 1st Mov. - LIVE Video/Recording  (Read 1260 times)

Offline daniele1234

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A video taken from me playing the 1st movement of Beethoven's Emperor piano concerto with my school orchestra at my school's 'concerto concert'. We only rehearsed twice so the it's rather rough around the edges (in some way gives it that uncontrolled Beethoven quality!) but I enjoyed playing it nonetheless. All thoughts welcome :) (Link at the bottom)

https://photos.app.goo.gl/XkjWvYAguqA9Dcb9A
Currently learning:

- Schumann Kreisleriana
- Franck Prelude, Chorale and Fugue
- Xenakis Herma
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Offline daniele1234

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  • Posts: 85
Re: Emperor Concerto Beethoven 1st Mov. - LIVE Video/Recording
Reply #1 on: January 25, 2020, 11:44:34 PM
Anything welcome :)
Currently learning:

- Schumann Kreisleriana
- Franck Prelude, Chorale and Fugue
- Xenakis Herma

Offline quantum

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  • Posts: 6223
Re: Emperor Concerto Beethoven 1st Mov. - LIVE Video/Recording
Reply #2 on: February 18, 2020, 06:50:09 AM
This is excellent playing.  You have a very good understanding of the idiomatic dynamic contrasts in Beethoven's music.  Cadenzas were well shaped and had a sense of line and clear direction.  Parts where the piano carried the melody, were defined and phrased well.  Fast passage work was crisp and articulate. 

We don't always have the luxury of all the rehearsal time we need.  This is true even for professional musicians.  Always make the most of the time you have, even if it is very little.

Watch your conductor: especially at entrances preceded by rest, where there is a change in the music, where the is a change in tempo, or where there is an important piece of the music that needs to be closely coordinated with the orchestra.  Watch in preparation, rather than after the fact.  A few beats before it is time to play, prepare you hands over the keys then look up.  As one of my teachers used to say: you can stare at a note for as long as you want, but it will never change!  Prepare your hands over the keys then look up, those keys aren't going anywhere and you don't need to keep looking at them while waiting.  Watching the conductor is something you can practice on your own, just as a conductor practices conducting empty chairs.  Make it part of the music, and it will be natural occurrence in actual performance.

One of the conductors I studied with always used to change parts the music without telling the choir, to make sure the members were attentive 100% of the time.  If a member was attentive, there was no problem because one would be able to follow the change in direction. 

If an adjustment is needed in a live performance, use the upbeat to define the character of what follows.  So if you feel the orchestra is dragging a bit, use the upbeat before a phrase to indicate your idea. 

Looking forward to hearing more of your music.
Made a Liszt. Need new Handel's for Soler panel & Alkan foil. Will Faure Stein on the way to pick up Mendels' sohn. Josquin get Wolfgangs Schu with Clara. Gone Chopin, I'll be Bach
 

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