Piano Forum



New Book: The Piano - A History in 100 Pieces
Pianist Susan Tomes' praised book "The Piano - A History in 100 Pieces", charts the development of the piano from the late eighteenth century to the present day. Tomes takes the reader with her on a personal journey through 100 pieces including solo works, chamber music, concertos, and jazz. Piano Street talked to Susan Tomes about her book. Read more >>

Topic: Picking the piano back up, looking for new repertoire  (Read 1373 times)

Offline tkyxd_

  • PS Silver Member
  • Newbie
  • ***
  • Posts: 3
Hi everyone,

After obtaining my ABRSM Grade 8 certificate a few years ago with a teacher, I've recently gotten back into classical music, and am looking to learn some new music by myself. In the past, I have learned pieces such as Chopin's Grande Valse Brillante in E Major, as well as Beethoven's Sonata in G major Op. 14 No. 2. Recently, I have also attempted Chopin's Nocturne Op.9 No.2 without much trouble.

I was thinking of attempting a more difficult Beethoven Sonata such as Moonlight (3rd mvt.) or Pathetique, or even a Chopin Etude, but am not sure whether these pieces are too difficult for me. If anyone could advise me on whether I should attempt these pieces, or recommend me other pieces of a similar or slightly higher technical difficulty, that would be great!

Thank you

Offline pianoannieq

  • PS Silver Member
  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 41
Re: Picking the piano back up, looking for new repertoire
Reply #1 on: June 01, 2020, 10:15:25 PM
Hi Tkyxd,

In my opinion, Pathetique is easier than the third movement of Moonlight, but I think both are within your ability if you can dedicate lots of practice time to them. If you would like to learn a Chopin etude, I would suggest op.10 no.3/6/9, op.25 no.1/7, and his easier Trois nouvelles but always choose one that interests you!

There are lots of pieces that I would recommend, but what are some other pieces you like or would like to learn? Based on the pieces you would like to learn, here are a few suggestions: Chopin Nocturne op.9 no.1, Chopin Nocturne op.27 no.1, Chopin Nocturne op.72 no.1, Rachmaninoff Prelude op.3 no.2, and Ravel's Pavane pour une infante défunte.

You can find music for all of these on imslp. I think they're all within your grasp so let us know how it goes! I hope you liked the suggestions :)
I hate music (and sarcasm) :)

Beethoven Sonata 18
Liszt Rhapsodie Espagnole
Prokofiev Sonata 4 op.29
Scriabin Piano Concerto

Offline tkyxd_

  • PS Silver Member
  • Newbie
  • ***
  • Posts: 3
Re: Picking the piano back up, looking for new repertoire
Reply #2 on: June 02, 2020, 09:36:56 AM
Hey pianoannieq,

Thanks for your reply! Really appreciate your recommendations as well. I'll look into the nocturnes you suggested and the Rach prelude which I've heard before but never really gotten to learning it. I think I'll start on the some of the new pieces you suggested once I've mastered Op. 9 No.2 (soon!).

Ultimately, I want to be able to play Chopin's more advanced (and famous) repertoire (Ballades, Etudes, etc.). His compositions really are masterpieces, and got me back into classical music after I dropped lessons out of disinterest. Beethoven's sonatas are great as well! They've given me a newfound appreciation for classical music.

Winter wind and Revolutionary etudes are some etudes I really like and want to do eventually, but I think I'm still probably some ways off, but someday I hope to be able to tackle them as well.


If anyone else has any other recommendations or opinions, do leave a reply, I am interested in reading them!

Offline pianoannieq

  • PS Silver Member
  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 41
Re: Picking the piano back up, looking for new repertoire
Reply #3 on: June 03, 2020, 05:59:07 PM
Hi Tkyxd,

I'm glad Chopin's pieces encouraged you to get back into classical piano! I love his ballades as well; some of my other favorites are his Scherzi and his third sonata.

Revolutionary is not extremely difficult. It was the second etude I learned (after op.10 no.9). I think the musicality is much harder than the technical aspects, so try sightreading a few measures of it!

Let me know what you think of the recommendations, I have some others if you're interested :) Best of luck!
I hate music (and sarcasm) :)

Beethoven Sonata 18
Liszt Rhapsodie Espagnole
Prokofiev Sonata 4 op.29
Scriabin Piano Concerto
 

Logo light pianostreet.com - the website for classical pianists, piano teachers, students and piano music enthusiasts.

Subscribe for unlimited access

Sign up

Follow us

Piano Street Digicert