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Best way to go about learning piano? (second instrument) (Read 795 times)

Offline relindwto6

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Best way to go about learning piano? (second instrument)
« on: July 09, 2020, 09:56:37 AM »
I've played Saxophone for years (classical) and have a full understanding of music theory. I've dabbled with piano a little, and learned a bach minuet and the first ~2 minutes of jesus joy of man's desire from nothing, but this is the only experience I have with piano.

There are plenty of resources that teach beginners how to play piano, but how would you recommend someone with 7+ years of prior experience to learn?

End goal is NOT to play pop songs, but rather some Chopin etc.

Offline outin

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Re: Best way to go about learning piano? (second instrument)
«Reply #1 on: July 09, 2020, 12:11:41 PM »
I've played Saxophone for years (classical) and have a full understanding of music theory. I've dabbled with piano a little, and learned a bach minuet and the first ~2 minutes of jesus joy of man's desire from nothing, but this is the only experience I have with piano.

There are plenty of resources that teach beginners how to play piano, but how would you recommend someone with 7+ years of prior experience to learn?

End goal is NOT to play pop songs, but rather some Chopin etc.
I would recommend a competent teacher who is flexible enough to allow you to learn classical repertoire at your own pace and interest, so not force you to go through years of method books. It is entirely possible to jump straight to real music, even if not Chopin. Since you already play an instrument, I'm sure you already know that you will have to prepare to do a lot of practice to reach that level.

Offline pianolover91

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Re: Best way to go about learning piano? (second instrument)
«Reply #2 on: July 26, 2020, 01:54:31 PM »
I would personally recommend starting with a teacher, to learn the basics, like reading notes, assigning notes to the piano keys, distinguishing note values, playing major and minor scales, triads and chords, and different tempos. Once you have a good base, then you can go on by yourself. I consider that it will be easier for you to learn it, having already experience with another instrument.

I would check this out for a better explanation: https://www.musiklux.de/klavierspielen-lernen/

Offline chopins_piano

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Re: Best way to go about learning piano? (second instrument)
«Reply #3 on: July 28, 2020, 10:49:37 PM »
Do not take online music classes. I repeat. DO NOT TAKE ONLINE MUSIC CLASSES. Those things are the last resort and don't actually teach you the things they claim to. Honestly, I agree with hiring a teacher who puts your interests before years worth of Hanon practice. I would recommend you, for starters (since you want to learn Chopin), a prelude. Try listening to them and see which you prefer. Then when techniques improve, start on some of the easier etudes and work your way up. At least that's how I did it. Pretty effective. Would recommend.

Offline j_tour

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Re: Best way to go about learning piano? (second instrument)
«Reply #4 on: July 29, 2020, 12:45:23 AM »
I would recommend a competent teacher who is flexible enough to allow you to learn classical repertoire at your own pace and interest, so not force you to go through years of method books. It is entirely possible to jump straight to real music, even if not Chopin. Since you already play an instrument, I'm sure you already know that you will have to prepare to do a lot of practice to reach that level.

It pains me to say it, but this is probably right.  :)

And as another commentator added, there's absolutely plenty of Chopin that requires not much technique beyond your ability.

In fact, people like you formed the bulk of my students, which, although not very lucrative to me, was a lot of fun.

Namely, people who had fairly well developed ears, very defined goals, and had their own equipment whether from friends or rehearsal spaces they'd used.

No, you'd have to look for the golden unicorn of a pianist who can teach fundamentals, as well as has a pretty deep knowledge of appropriate repertoire.

You can do a lot of stuff on your own at the keyboard, fundamentals, but you may find it difficult to assign yourself the appropriate repertoire.

That is, if you have the main ideas of technique down, including just simply fingering, then you can play scales and arpeggios.  It won't hurt you or block your progress, on the proviso that you have the principles of motion down.  I wouldn't know how much of that you can learn through a book, and I certainly wouldn't trust some moron on Youtube trying to sell ads:  easier just to get somebody to demonstrate.  You probably have some pianist friends who could take ten minutes and show you the basic idea.

And, even though everybody says it so often, it's really not a joke, even for experienced pianists to overtax themselves at rep in a high speed or in unusual hand positions.

No, you won't hurt yourself doing the average pop tune, probably, but if the more uncomfortable Chopin is your goal, then you should acquire the ability to perform some of the odd configurations in a correct manner.

IMHO it's kind of like improvising jazz:  nowadays, there's lots of books and videos, but you could spend hundreds of hours or even weeks getting practical information, or probably one sympathetic teacher/friend/colleague can likely show you the basic idea in a half-hour or so.

The principles are not very complicated, although there are different schools of thought, but you have a big advantage in that you're already an accomplished musician.
My name is Nellie, and I take pride in helping protect the children of my community through active leadership roles in my local church and in the Boy Scouts of America.  Bad word make me sad.

Offline roundcubeten

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Re: Best way to go about learning piano? (second instrument)
«Reply #5 on: October 02, 2020, 10:43:51 AM »
Learning piano is a remarkable procedure full of enjoyment and frustrations. With the modern and advanced technology nowadays, it allows anyone to obtain knowledge and skills at a click of fingertips. The learning piano online is becoming a popular and a passion of many music lovers. It can be more beneficial since it can save money and time.

Learning piano online gives you guide and reference about piano lessons, giving you tips and listening to music played by pianos. Further, it will teach you the basics of playing piano, theory of music, and functions of piano. This online guide helps those beginners, professionals or someone who wants to play this musical instrument. Learning online piano only uses collection of audio, video and software references. This is an advantage to those who have no this kind of instrument in their place.

Offline keystosuccess

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Re: Best way to go about learning piano? (second instrument)
«Reply #6 on: October 12, 2020, 09:05:06 AM »
Hi, I recently stumbled across some tips and tricks on how to learn piano: https://www.musiklux.de/klavierspielen-lernen/. The article is in German, but you can use Google Translate or DeepL for translation. I hope it would be helpful! Cheers!

Offline keypeg

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Re: Best way to go about learning piano? (second instrument)
«Reply #7 on: October 12, 2020, 04:29:21 PM »
Do not take online music classes. I repeat.

I have been registered with several excellent classes.  I have even seen students who had poor quality local teachers being helped with problems that the regular teacher could not handle (or caused).  The advice is way too broad.  Often such advice comes from people who have had a quick look-see, or explored one or two places, and then has an inaccurate generalized impression.