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Notation around chord (Read 930 times)

Offline jimf12

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Notation around chord
« on: August 11, 2020, 02:51:45 PM »
I think I know the answer, but I thought I would ask to make sure.   In Satie's Gymnopedies #1, starting at measure 9, there is a chord (BDF(#)) there is a bracket like symbol just under the forte notation that is a straight line with the upper terminus touching the "f" (forte).   The line is parallel with the stem of the chord, and has a short 90 degree foot at the bottom.    The next four chords have this symbol.   At measure 13, the dynamics change to pianissimo and again this symbol exists with the upper terminus of the stem touching the pp.   The difference with this symbol is that the 90 short degree appendage is a hat, at the top of the line.

My guess:   This is an indication to play the chords forte, but the other notes would be unaffected by the forte designation. 

What is this called?   

Piano Street's Digital Sheet Music Library

Satie: Gymnopedie, no 1
piano sheet music of Gymnopedie


Offline 1piano4joe

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Re: Notation around chord
«Reply #1 on: August 11, 2020, 04:11:24 PM »
Hi jimf12,

Welcome to Pianostreet!

I looked at several different scores and couldn't find what you describe. I don't think your "brackets" have anything to do with dynamics.

The left hand is played with a stride technique where you first play the base note then the chord. The melody quarter notes are played by the right hand.

A good starting point is to just pedal every measure.

I would look at a different score.

Here is an example



I hope I have been helpful, Joe.

P.S. I would be more concerned with balance and producing the sound I want such as shaping the melody and not playing the chord too loud.

P.P.S.  I believe the brackets your talking about are an instruction for you to play the chords in measures 9-12 with the right hand.

Offline jimf12

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Re: Notation around chord
«Reply #2 on: August 11, 2020, 04:28:25 PM »
It's a Schirmer edition.     I added some attachments of phone pics.

Offline themeandvariation

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Re: Notation around chord
«Reply #3 on: August 11, 2020, 04:34:04 PM »
It means that the chord is to be played with the RH.- (although written in the bass clef)
4'33"

Offline 1piano4joe

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Re: Notation around chord
«Reply #4 on: August 11, 2020, 04:35:59 PM »
Hi jim12,

Yes, that's exactly what I thought. Unlike the beginning where those same chords are played with the left hand, they are here to be played with the right hand. They are written on the bass clef so those brackets instruct you to use your right hand. That's all it is.

Your 2nd image shows a "L" bracket meaning use the right hand and in the next measure and upside down letter "L" which means use the left hand.

I just found a score where those chords are written in the treble clef and to be played by the right hand.

https://www.free-scores.com/download-sheet-music.php?pdf=353

Offline jimf12

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Re: Notation around chord
«Reply #5 on: August 11, 2020, 04:46:22 PM »
Thank you both so much!   I have been playing those with the left.   I just kind of get my right arm out of the way and keep the same technique throughout.   If I'm comfortable with that, should I change?

Also, I assume all notes of the chord are to be played even though the F# is already being played and held, correct?

Offline 1piano4joe

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Re: Notation around chord
«Reply #6 on: August 11, 2020, 04:51:12 PM »
Yes, release the first f#, (the pedal is holding it anyway), then on beat two play the full chord with the right hand but release the bottom two notes but keep holding the f# since it is tied across the bar line and would be lost when you pedal.