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Sheet Music with Finger Numbers (Read 345 times)

Offline sideways

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Sheet Music with Finger Numbers
« on: July 11, 2021, 08:16:18 PM »
I have for quite awhile now playing only sheet music that had finger numbering. How common is that?  I recently bought a Carol King Songbook, and I think I could play some of her songs, but not knowing the numbering of the fingers is really slowing me down. Of Course she is far better at piano playing than me, maybe has longer fingers I don't know, but sometimes I feel I must contort my fingers or do it the wrong way to play her songs. I can reach everything she does, but it's awkward.  For example, she may have on the right hand press an A on finger 1 and 5, holding the A5 for 3 quarter notes and then playing sequentially "C" and F" ending with A1 - A5 as a quarter note.   I find it easier to move my thumb to C, and lifting the A1 and placing it back again when the final A1-A5 is pressed.  Hope that makes sense.  I'd buy another Carol King song book  (or sheet music to say Tapestry) if I could get it with suggested numbering.

Offline j_tour

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Re: Sheet Music with Finger Numbers
«Reply #1 on: July 12, 2021, 12:08:49 AM »
I'm pretty sure I've never seen any transcriptions of any kind of music with fingerings included, meaning reasonably accurate transcriptions taken directly from the recordings.  I doubt any exist.

Maybe in some primer or type of graded book there are some arrangements with fingerings.

If I'm understanding your example correctly, you're playing a perfect fifth (A + E) in the RH, then (C+F) quickly above it, then back again?

What's wrong with the way you're doing it now?  If that works for you, I don't see why not.  If I had some reason to do that, I'd probably use 1 and 3 for the A5 "power chord," and then maybe 2 and 5 for the bVI chord (or whatever it's supposed to be, with the C and F). 

You can probably find some concert video of Carole King playing her tunes and see what fingerings she uses, if you want to go to the effort.

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Offline sideways

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Re: Sheet Music with Finger Numbers
«Reply #2 on: July 12, 2021, 07:36:53 PM »
Thanks J_Tour,  I think your advice really helps.  I have decided to go for comfort and smoothness.  If there is something I can't do with ease, such as some chords with 4 notes, I will probably just drop the highest note.  The lesson books I have played almost none of them do chords with 4  fingers, and very few of them have chords that play with the right hand that  are mostly below the treble clef, which Carole King song book seems to have a lot of.  So, I am kind of taking off the training wheels.   I am happy and  feel that moving from training books to 'real' books is giving my skill level a big boost. At first I was a little intimidated that I would even try to play a song written by such a great artist as Carole King.

So thanks for your feedback. 

Offline determined2learn

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Re: Sheet Music with Finger Numbers
«Reply #3 on: July 13, 2021, 08:41:09 PM »
I'm working on level one pieces and watch many videos to assist with learning the pieces. Julian Lambert often suggests alternate fingering than what is given in the book. As long as you are consistent, use fingering that works for you. Good luck!

Offline lostinidlewonder

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Re: Sheet Music with Finger Numbers
«Reply #4 on: July 14, 2021, 10:54:08 PM »
For example... on the right hand press an A on finger 1 and 5, holding the A5 for 3 quarter notes and then playing sequentially "C" and F" ending with A1 - A5 as a quarter note.   I find it easier to move my thumb to C, and lifting the A1 and placing it back again when the final A1-A5 is pressed.
You mean A finger 1 and 5 (which implies an octave of A's being played) then from within that octave bound you are playing C and F then finishing with A octave again. It is not a good idea to use the thumb for the C since it will unnecessarily contract your hand which only has to expand again to play the A octaves once more. It is a general rule when playing the piano to play as lazily as possible and not to contract and expand your hand unnecessarily. You should use (15)24(15) rather than (15)13(15), even if the 24 interval feels stretchy and difficult you should push yourself to become accustomed to such pattern because it is not that uncommon. If it is physically impossible or terribly tense then you may have to abandon trying to use 24, however then piano might not be the best instrument to try to study unless you get a reduced key width keyboard.

You should post snippets of passages (and the bars surrounding it) that trouble you and people can offer you fingering suggestions.
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