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How do I play bars 147, 210-212 (My Favorite Things - Joey Alexander)? (Read 472 times)

Offline mathandmusic

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Hey. I'm trying to learn this piece: https://youtu.be/x8O7n2pWrPI?t=194 and am a stuck on bars 147, 210-212.

Bar 147
The piece is in 3/4 time and I don't know what's meant by the "2" above those notes. Assuming the rhythm of the bar is valid, the first two notes (A's) must be equal in count to the whole and half note (C, E).

I tried figuring out how to play the rhythm by subdividing the beat (see image in link below). I don't know if it's worth describing my notation but it's suppose to model the beat (spike), when to play a note/transition to a new note (bubble) and for how long (flat line).

Treble Bar 147

Bars 210-212
I think this is a 2-against-3 polyrhythm.

Treble Bar 210

Offline ivorycherry

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Ok, Iím not completely sure on this, but I think the 2s over some of the bars just mean the beat has only 2 beats instead of 3. In one of my pieces I once played had a three over some notes covering 4 beats, but since the notes with the 2ís over them are already worth 2 beats, i think it means the bar just has 2 beats. I believe bars 210-212  is played normally intead of in a 2-3 polyrythym and the concept with the 2s is the same as I stated above. Attached is a picture of of how I think bars 210-212 should be played.


Offline ivorycherry

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Hope that helps

Offline anacrusis

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I don't quite understand the illustrations you drew, but watching the video, the 2 in the bracket works similarly to if there is, for example, a 3 in a bracket (which indicates triplets). In this case, it means two quarter notes with the 2 over them fits into the space of 3 normal quarter note beats. So in reality their length is like a dotted quarter note each.

Offline mathandmusic

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Ok, Iím not completely sure on this, but I think the 2s over some of the bars just mean the beat has only 2 beats instead of 3. In one of my pieces I once played had a three over some notes covering 4 beats, but since the notes with the 2ís over them are already worth 2 beats, i think it means the bar just has 2 beats. I believe bars 210-212  is played normally intead of in a 2-3 polyrythym and the concept with the 2s is the same as I stated above. Attached is a picture of of how I think bars 210-212 should be played.

I don't think this is right since changing the number of beats to 2 in a measure would change the meter/signature. I don't think there's anything wrong with changing signatures in the middle of a piece but it's not typically done. Imagine having to adjust your metronome from 3/4 to 2/4 for 2 bars just to practice!

I think I figured out how to play it/count it though. I think what we're describing is called tuplets (duples, triplets, quadruplets in our case).

The idea is that the 3/4 meter does not change. You fit the specified number of notes into the meter evenly.

Will post a picture on how to count them later.

Offline anacrusis

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I think I figured out how to play it/count it though. I think what we're describing is called tuplets (duples, triplets, quadruplets in our case).

The idea is that the 3/4 meter does not change. You fit the specified number of notes into the meter evenly.


Yes. This is what I tried to explain with my comment.

Offline ivorycherry

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I don't quite understand the illustrations you drew, but watching the video, the 2 in the bracket works similarly to if there is, for example, a 3 in a bracket (which indicates triplets). In this case, it means two quarter notes with the 2 over them fits into the space of 3 normal quarter note beats. So in reality their length is like a dotted quarter note each.

Oh ok, that makes sense. I had it the other way around.
I don't think this is right since changing the number of beats to 2 in a measure would change the meter/signature. I don't think there's anything wrong with changing signatures in the middle of a piece but it's not typically done. Imagine having to adjust your metronome from 3/4 to 2/4 for 2 bars just to practice!

I think I figured out how to play it/count it though. I think what we're describing is called tuplets (duples, triplets, quadruplets in our case).

The idea is that the 3/4 meter does not change. You fit the specified number of notes into the meter evenly.

Will post a picture on how to count them later.

Yeah, youíre probably right. Well at least I learned something new.

Offline lostinidlewonder

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Errr it written idiotically. Dotted crotchets (worth three quavers) is how you look at the two crotchet notes under a 2(duplet). So it's three beats of quavers split into two groups, then it's easy to line everything up. Whoever wrote this doesn't know how to use dotted notes I guess lol. So a crotchet under half of the duplet is worth three quavers and two quavers under half of the duplet would be the speed of three quavers as two (so two dotted quavers or can be visualized in units of semi quavers to expand the segmentation for easier analysis)
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