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Topic: Senior Recital Repertoire  (Read 1902 times)

Offline oliviarosemusic

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Senior Recital Repertoire
on: August 08, 2021, 03:21:31 PM
Hello! I am preparing my repertoire selections for my senior recital, and have a few areas that I'm not quite sold on yet.

As of now, my recital is:
Bach, Prelude and Fugue in G, from book 1 of the WTC
Haydn, Sonata no 50 in D
Selections from Yoshimatsu, Pleiades Dances
Selections from Scriabin, Preludes, op. 11
Albeniz, Iberia bk 2

I am currently viewing both the Haydn and the Scriabin as placeholders. I'm looking for a light-hearted classical sonata, roughly 10-15 minutes in length, with more technical challenge. However much I love this sonata, it doesn't feel rigorous enough for senior rep.

I would also like to find a Russian work, again roughly 10-15 minutes. The reason I hesitate to use the Scriabin is that so much of my recital is multi-movement works, rather than longer-form pieces. I want to find a single movement work.

Any ideas?

Offline thorn

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Re: Senior Recital Repertoire
Reply #1 on: August 08, 2021, 06:32:54 PM
I don't see a problem with your Haydn because the Albeniz more than balances out the overall technical demands of your program.

For the single-movement Russian work, why not a late Scriabin sonata (5-10)?

Offline ronde_des_sylphes

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Re: Senior Recital Repertoire
Reply #2 on: August 08, 2021, 08:09:36 PM
Also, why not the Scriabin Fantasie in place of the preludes?
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Offline ivorycherry

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Re: Senior Recital Repertoire
Reply #3 on: August 08, 2021, 08:25:58 PM
For the single-movement Russian work, why not a late Scriabin sonata (5-10)?
Yes yes. Or even 4. Iím currently learning it and I love it. 5 is my favorite though. Favorite late ones 7 and 9 though.

Also, why not the Scriabin Fantasie in place of the preludes?
Also a great choice.

Offline nightwindsonata

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Re: Senior Recital Repertoire
Reply #4 on: August 09, 2021, 04:29:37 AM
A few more ideas for the Russian pieces:

-Prokofiev Third Sonata (only 7 minutes, but still a tour-de-force for sure).

-The Scriabin Fantasie is a great piece. Terribly difficult, even as Russian pieces go! Be ready for a challenge when working on it.

-Check out the Medtner Sonata-Triad, Op. 11! Even one of those Sonatas is terrifyingly difficult, and would go very well in your program, I think. I might also recommend the Sonata Ballade, Op. 27. This piece is extremely difficult, and does have several sections (though not exactly movements) that blend together seamlessly. It is definitely the most difficult piece on this list! Disclaimer, the only piece on this list that I have actually played is the first one from Op. 11, and even then only partially (it was a side project that I dropped in favor of some other pieces, will return to it eventually). Either way, you would do well to research Medtner's music, it is not played often and contains a lot of the things that people usually are looking for when they want to play Russian music!
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Offline nabs00

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Re: Senior Recital Repertoire
Reply #5 on: September 08, 2021, 05:14:41 PM



Consider playing Iberia Book1:it works better as a set in concert. It's not the end of the world if you learned Book2 already, but Rondena and Almeria don't really contrast each other enough for it to really be convincing in a concert. But what do I know

I'm looking for a light-hearted classical sonata, roughly 10-15 minutes in length, with more technical challenge. However much I love this sonata, it doesn't feel rigorous enough for senior rep.
I would be hard pressed to find a "technically challenging" classical sonata that is also light-hearted and 10 min long. You don't play classical sonatas (even Beethoven Sonatas) for their technical rigor, because there is more to being a pianist than being an athlete ;D!! They don't show off your technique, they show off your maturity (this includes all 32 of Beethoven's Sonatas). Take that original Haydn Sonata you mentioned and work it until your timing/tone/control are excellent and then tell me how easy it was. It's more than learning the notes. Also I'm not roasting you, I just used to think the same way. Brendel and Schiff aren't famous for being showoffs in that sense.

Look at Haydn hob.52 (your teacher may not give you the green light for that tho) and Grieg Sonata (the Grieg is also about maturity and control, when played well it will really charm an audience). Save the virtuosity for Triana lol.

Offline lelle

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Re: Senior Recital Repertoire
Reply #6 on: September 09, 2021, 07:43:04 PM

I would be hard pressed to find a "technically challenging" classical sonata that is also light-hearted and 10 min long. You don't play classical sonatas (even Beethoven Sonatas) for their technical rigor, because there is more to being a pianist than being an athlete ;D!! They don't show off your technique, they show off your maturity (this includes all 32 of Beethoven's Sonatas).

I would disagree. Beethoven Op 2 no 3 is but one example of a sonata that definitely was intended to show of his virtuoso skillz (it's not 10 minutes long though, I'll give you that). The final Mozart sonata, in D major, is perhaps not a virtuoso show piece, but it's not easy either, it needs a refined technique to play well, IMO.

Offline fftransform

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Re: Senior Recital Repertoire
Reply #7 on: September 13, 2021, 01:53:19 AM
The Mozart K. 280 is pretty fast, has a really nice middle movement and is definitely light-hearted.  It's played in competitions from time to time, it's not considered easy:



If you want something legit-hard, try Soler, which would pair well with the Albeniz:



Offline jimroof

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Re: Senior Recital Repertoire
Reply #8 on: October 18, 2021, 02:15:48 AM
For a rather light-hearted classical sonata... Beethoven's Opus 31 #3 might be worth a listen.  4 movements and the last will take some work to play cleanly.  Might be a little long at about 22-23 minutes total.
Chopin Ballades
Chopin Scherzos 2 and 3
Mephisto Waltz 1
Beethoven Piano Concerto 3
Schumann Concerto Am
Ginastera Piano Sonata
L'isle Joyeuse
Feux d'Artifice
Prokofiev Sonata Dm
 

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