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Topic: Improvisation in classical works - Fantaisie Impromptu Op.66  (Read 1764 times)

Offline nfp001

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Hi fellow pianists,

Lately improvisation has been center in my mind. What are your opinions concerning improvisation in (certain types) of classical works, how do you think it is received by the public (and purists), to what degree is it too much ? By now, we’ve heard those works for hundreds and hundreds of times since literally hundreds of years, I think that in the future some kind of creative personal touch (other than interpretative) in classical works will become more popular in performance and become more of a part of the whole interpretation. It will serve as keeping the public and future generations interested and differentiate those who will sale out concerts and those you will struggle, since we have all that beautiful music at our finger tips in the comfort of our own homes. I know this cannot change the feel of a live concert but I strongly believe that things are changing and will evolve massively in the performance world as it’s been the case since the advent of recording.

Peace,

NF
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Offline ranjit

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Re: Improvisation in classical works - Fantaisie Impromptu Op.66
Reply #1 on: August 18, 2021, 05:35:37 PM
The fact is that it's basically not acceptable nowadays to improvise. What Shiskin plays is a well-known variation.

Offline anacrusis

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Re: Improvisation in classical works - Fantaisie Impromptu Op.66
Reply #2 on: August 18, 2021, 11:21:05 PM
There are improvisational variants for Nocturne Op 9 no 2 written by Chopin himself, so it was definitely intended by the composers of the time to improvise over at least certain types of pieces. Unfortunately this seems to be frowned upon these days.

Offline lostinidlewonder

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Re: Improvisation in classical works - Fantaisie Impromptu Op.66
Reply #3 on: August 19, 2021, 01:00:06 AM
Lately improvisation has been center in my mind. What are your opinions concerning improvisation in (certain types) of classical works, how do you think it is received by the public (and purists), to what degree is it too much ?
I improvised a whole half of a concert once, it went down well. I didn't play anything known just created something on the spot. It was a free concert so I didn't care if the improvisation was bad or not but actually had people come up to me and express how much they liked it. I don't think I would improvise in a paid concert.

I think that in the future some kind of creative personal touch (other than interpretative) in classical works will become more popular in performance and become more of a part of the whole interpretation. It will serve as keeping the public and future generations interested and differentiate those who will sale out concerts and those you will struggle, since we have all that beautiful music at our finger tips in the comfort of our own homes.
"Classical" music is not popular to start with so to go ahead and try to alter works that master composers created will really not improve the situation at all, unless you use musical devices other than exclusively the piano and created something in the popular charting genre of today.

No idea what you are on about "sale out concerts" if you knew how concerts were sold and organized, improvising over classical music will not help your sales at all.
"The biggest risk in life is to take no risk at all."
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