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Learning piano on a keyboard: doubt regarding dynamics (Read 555 times)

Offline gabriels

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Learning piano on a keyboard: doubt regarding dynamics
« on: August 27, 2021, 04:48:50 PM »
I have recently started having piano classes in person, before they were online.

At home, I use a keyboard with no dynamics for my practices. During classes, I hear how inconstant are my dynamics skills. I cannot play the entire sheet music in a desired constant mezzo piano/mezzo forte on the piano instrument, the sounds become, against my will, piano, forte, pianissimo, fortissimo on a random part of the piece.

Would this be a problem, as I hope to play in public in the future, and the people there might own a piano, not a keyboard? I am a beginner and have 6 months of piano.

Offline themeandvariation

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Re: Learning piano on a keyboard: doubt regarding dynamics
«Reply #1 on: August 27, 2021, 05:01:47 PM »
AS soon as you are able, you should purchase a full size keyboard which has weighted keys and can produce dynamic changes. Used ones can be relatively cheep.
The physicality of the playing is important, and your practicing keyboard should be equipped.
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Offline j_tour

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Re: Learning piano on a keyboard: doubt regarding dynamics
«Reply #2 on: August 27, 2021, 05:26:29 PM »
Do you really mean "no" dynamics, at all, on your practice instrument? 

Or perhaps just insufficient range, which could even be put down to the speakers you're using?  Hint, though:  I wouldn't use headphones to practice unless absolutely necessary, and even then, only if you already know how to play.

Anyway, yeah.  The cheapest Casio you can find would be a huge improvement:  even a semi-weighted board could get you through for a while, perhaps years even, (not the same, but can be pretty close to, say, a spinet piano action), but hammer-action keyboards (and, no, none that I know of use springs to replicate the hammer action, not for a long time it hasn't been) are really down in price for the past ten years, even fifteen years and more.  Anything you can buy now will have touch sensitivity and some ability to control the "depth" of the volume (and, likely, tone) produced.

Here's an example:  for fun, once, I turned off velocity sensitivity on my old Yamaha stage piano to practice Bach in voix égales at home.  It did not in any way resemble a piano, except in raw tone.  I still do sometimes turn it off when using it to control the lower manual of a Hammond organ sound, on occasion, but that's an organ, not a piano.

Are you sure there isn't a setting you might have disabled inadvertently? 

Even synthesizer boards from the mid-1980s always had some kind of ability to reproduce touch sensitivity, in addition to "after-touch" and even "polyphonic aftertouch."  I'm curious what exactly you're using, now that you mention it.

But, yeah:  sell the kids, mortgage the wife, pawn the luggage, whatever it takes to get the most basic modern keyboard you can.
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Offline scientistplayspiano

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Re: Learning piano on a keyboard: doubt regarding dynamics
«Reply #3 on: September 20, 2021, 04:57:26 AM »
If you are on a tight budget, buy a $500 PX-S1000 keyboard. It is portable and has good weighted keys. It is a necessary investment. 

Offline mikey shooes

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Re: Learning piano on a keyboard: doubt regarding dynamics
«Reply #4 on: September 22, 2021, 08:33:43 AM »
I have recently started having piano classes in person, before they were online.

At home, I use a keyboard with no dynamics for my practices. During classes, I hear how inconstant are my dynamics skills. I cannot play the entire sheet music in a desired constant mezzo piano/mezzo forte on the piano instrument, the sounds become, against my will, piano, forte, pianissimo, fortissimo on a random part of the piece.

Would this be a problem, as I hope to play in public in the future, and the people there might own a piano, not a keyboard? I am a beginner and have 6 months of piano.

I agree, this is a huge problem. Last year during the lockdown I was saved only by what I have at home
Korg B2 SP Black, but even on it the recoil was unnatural. Semitones, sustain-these are very important things in the game. And I think last year went to me only in the negative.