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Topic: Waldstein Sonata Trills  (Read 584 times)

Offline bwl_13

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Waldstein Sonata Trills
on: August 07, 2022, 09:53:43 PM
So I've started the Waldstein finale. It's a beast for sure, but so far hasn't been too bad (I've played until about the second episode and the beginning of the coda). However, the trills in the ff section of the theme are extremely challenging to both sync with the left hand, and to voice out the melody.

I'm wondering whether it's okay to break this trill in order to have more clarity in the melody? I know there are some similar passages later in the coda as well as the double trill.

Furthermore, if you have any general advice to look out for while tackling this movement it would be much appreciated. This is definitely the first time I've seen some of these techniques (8ve gliss, trill+melody in one hand, double trill), so it would be nice to have something to go off of since my teacher is on vacation until the end of the month.
Second Year Undergrad:
Bach BWV 914
Beethoven Op. 58
Reger Op. 24 No. 5
Rachmaninoff Op. 39 No. 3 & No. 5
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Offline thorn

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Re: Waldstein Sonata Trills
Reply #1 on: August 07, 2022, 10:35:33 PM
Schiff breaks the trill in this performance, but I doubt others could get away with it!


The main thing with trills (single/double/with melody, whatever) is to practice them slowly and count them as you would anything else. It sounds obvious but with trills our brains go onto autopilot because we don't have to think too hard about the notes involved but they still need proper counting, fingering etc.

I see you're also learning Ravel's Sonatine. If you've already mastered the first movement then the opening is the same technique (voicing a melody over trills). If you haven't learned this yet then I recommend spending some time with it as it's less demanding than Waldstein. 

Offline bwl_13

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Re: Waldstein Sonata Trills
Reply #2 on: August 08, 2022, 03:35:00 AM
I see you're also learning Ravel's Sonatine. If you've already mastered the first movement then the opening is the same technique (voicing a melody over trills). If you haven't learned this yet then I recommend spending some time with it as it's less demanding than Waldstein.
Yes I've been starting the Sonatine, but it's a bit more recent than the Waldstein, for which I have the first two movement at a pretty good level. The Ravel on the other hand, I've learned the notes to the Mineut and I'm still fumbling around with the first movement (which has such an awkward hand placement).

Honestly, that's some advice I'm completely on board with. I will likely learn the episodes in the Waldstein finale but spend more time with the Ravel. Both these pieces are so enjoyable to practice that I don't mind taking parts of the Waldstein a bit easy for now. Regardless, I've got a lot of time before either of these pieces need to be performance ready, I'm just trying to get a head start before school gets going.
Second Year Undergrad:
Bach BWV 914
Beethoven Op. 58
Reger Op. 24 No. 5
Rachmaninoff Op. 39 No. 3 & No. 5
 

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