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Author Topic: Fingering problem in Chopin Prelude No. 15  (Read 1311 times)
bttay
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« on: February 16, 2005, 03:54:33 AM »

How should I play the 9th bar in Chopin's Prelude no. 15?


The left hand  is stressed from low D to F. My hand is just not big enough for that. Should I play the F with my right hand? If so there is another problem of the inconsistancy of tone as the piece progresses.

Thanks.  Smiley
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piano sheet music of Prelude (Raindrop)
Egghead
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« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2005, 06:18:57 PM »

The left hand  is stressed from low D to F. My hand is just not big enough for that.
Hi bttay,
I am only a student myself, and my LH does not do this stretch from Dflat to F either...  Wink
Quote
Should I play the F with my right hand? If so there is another problem of the inconsistancy of tone as the piece progresses.
Using RH is what my teacher also suggested, and I didnt find it awkward. (I was going to use my nose, but he disapproves Grin). More seriously: What do you mean by "inconsistancy of tone"? Where exactly ("as the piece progresses") does it arise?

Regards, Egghead
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janice
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« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2005, 06:52:39 PM »

I think it's perfectly fine to use your right hand.  But make sure that you bring out the high F  (most likely, with finger 5) and ease up on your thumb, so that the lower F (played with your thumb). Smiley
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bttay
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« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2005, 02:08:18 AM »

I think it's perfectly fine to use your right hand.  But make sure that you bring out the high F  (most likely, with finger 5) and ease up on your thumb, so that the lower F (played with your thumb). Smiley

Thank you guys for your helpful answers.

EggHead, I think Janice has just answered to my question about the problem of the tone being different when I have to play the two "F"s in octave with RH. Without enough practice, the high F is going to sound weaker then the other notes in the melody. Look like I have to practice more.  Wink
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