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Lucas Debargue - A Matter of Life or Death
Pianist Lucas Debargue recently recorded the complete piano works of Gabriel Fauré on the Opus 102, a very special grand piano by Stephen Paulello. Eric Schoones from the German/Dutch magazine PIANIST had a conversation with him. Read more >>

Topic: Sonata quasi una fantasia Op 27 No. 2 mvt 1  (Read 125 times)

Offline klaviertraum

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Sonata quasi una fantasia Op 27 No. 2 mvt 1
on: May 23, 2024, 04:11:39 PM
Hi all,

For an amateur pianist it is irresistible not to feel tempted at some point to play this work as, to some extent, it is accessible from the technical standpoint. However, this movement is immensely complex in many other aspects. The phrases, the layers, details everywhere and the emotions behind.  I read that this is not about moonlight at all, but about death, sadness and grief. The manuscript (in the Musikverein in Vienna) has a few measures of Mozart's Don Giovanni transcribed with Beethoven's handwriting, corresponding to the section where the commendatore dies. It is a funeral march. The similarity between Mozart's music and this is staggering.

I tried to play it having all that into consideration, but I know it will never be enough.

Any feedback is welcomed,

KT

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Offline lelle

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Re: Sonata quasi una fantasia Op 27 No. 2 mvt 1
Reply #1 on: May 24, 2024, 07:34:05 AM
Beautifully played, great job with the orchestration of the different layers, and lovely attention to detail. I think you should be proud of your efforts here.

I agree that this is about sadness and grief and based on the idea of a funeral march rather than moonlight.

My main piece of feedback is that the triplets feel a bit restless/stressful. I don't think it's so much the tempo (which is fine) as a slight unevenness of rhythm and tone. I would advice you to practice this while approaching it almost as a meditation. Breathe very peacefully and calmly throughout the piece, while still feeling the grief and sadness, and transmit that meditative state into your playing.

You can also do focused work specifically on the triplets. Practice only the triplets and see if you can get them to be very even and quiet.

I know you keep track of many things in your head, but it's there in your playing now and you can start filing it away in your subconscious and focus on the big picture now.

Offline klaviertraum

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Re: Sonata quasi una fantasia Op 27 No. 2 mvt 1
Reply #2 on: May 25, 2024, 04:22:05 PM
Beautifully played, great job with the orchestration of the different layers, and lovely attention to detail. I think you should be proud of your efforts here.

I agree that this is about sadness and grief and based on the idea of a funeral march rather than moonlight.

My main piece of feedback is that the triplets feel a bit restless/stressful. I don't think it's so much the tempo (which is fine) as a slight unevenness of rhythm and tone. I would advice you to practice this while approaching it almost as a meditation. Breathe very peacefully and calmly throughout the piece, while still feeling the grief and sadness, and transmit that meditative state into your playing.

You can also do focused work specifically on the triplets. Practice only the triplets and see if you can get them to be very even and quiet.

I know you keep track of many things in your head, but it's there in your playing now and you can start filing it away in your subconscious and focus on the big picture now.

Thank you Ielle!, very useful feedback, I'll work on it.



 

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