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Author Topic: Trying to learn Chopin Nocturne Op9-2  (Read 3513 times)
tonedeaf
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« on: February 28, 2005, 05:12:22 PM »

I really really want to learn Chopin Nocturne Op9-2. But I just started piano for about less than 5 months. I'm trying for the Grade 3 ABRSM exam this year. I can play the pieces for the Grade 3 exam. But when I try playing Op9-2, I always stumble. (even for the first few bars). The problem is that my brain cannot process whether this note that I am going to play shld be played as a flat or a natural.

Can some kind soul give me some advice on how to start learning this piece? I really really really really want to learn it.

Thanks.
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piano sheet music of Nocturne
thierry13
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« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2005, 06:45:34 PM »

Maybe for someone who has 5 month of learning this is too complicated to understand but well here it is: first, do the scale in wich the piece is written. It's important, allways think of this scale as a reference. Repeat this scale a lot, so much it become natural. After you've done this, make the scales that are the major modulations of the piece you're trying to learn. And make a lot of arpegios from these scales too. Only when you will be at a total ease with those scales will you be able to do this piece without any dubt of the flat notes.
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bernhard
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« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2005, 07:09:17 PM »

Maybe for someone who has 5 month of learning this is too complicated to understand but well here it is: first, do the scale in wich the piece is written. It's important, allways think of this scale as a reference. Repeat this scale a lot, so much it become natural. After you've done this, make the scales that are the major modulations of the piece you're trying to learn. And make a lot of arpegios from these scales too. Only when you will be at a total ease with those scales will you be able to do this piece without any dubt of the flat notes.

This is excellent advice and you will not regret following it. Cheesy

You can also “simplify” the piece in a number of ways (ordered according to importance: most important first).

1.   Break it down into small (very small) passages and work on a passages until you master it. Then move on to the next passage. Start with the most difficult passages. Some passage you may have to break down to two notes (two notes are manageable by anyone).

2.   Learn each small passage with hands separate before moving on to join hands.

3.   Outline. That is, get rid of any unessential notes (the several ornaments and fiorituras, etc.) Don’t worry, after you master the outline you can put them back on.

If you have no idea about any of this, there are posts in the forum dealing with all of it in great detail. Search.

You may also find this online book very useful:

http://members.aol.com/cc88m/PianoBook.html

Finally, enrol your teacher’s help (after all you are paying him/her). Wink

Best wishes,
Bernhard.

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crotchet
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« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2005, 07:25:10 PM »

The first thing I do before practicing is to break it down into very small units, maybe for this one only the first measure.  I then work out logical fingering and write in the best fingering for my hand.  (not every note of course only the necessary ones).My hand may not use the same fingering as your hand but without the same fingering on each chord or note each time you practice is in my mind a complete waste of time. I spend a good deal of time on logical fingering.  Now I need help on the last part of this Nocturne.  The sixteenth notes in groupes of four (two measures before the end) how on earth can they be brought up to speed without the fingers falling over the place.  I supposed you're going to say, slow.slow. at first and gradually work up to speed....it seems this takes forever.  Any suggestions
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tonedeaf
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« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2005, 02:09:36 AM »

Thanks for the advice. I'll will try all of your methods and hopefully it works... Smiley

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Brian Healey
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« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2005, 06:34:14 AM »

I don't have any extra advice except to try not to get too discouraged. Since you've only been playing 5 months, this piece will be by no means easy. I don't know grades that well, but I would estimate that the Chopin 9/2 nocturne is probably about grade 8 (correct me if I'm wrong). For someone who is going for their grade 3 exam, that's a pretty big leap in difficulty.

However, I find it to be one of the most beautiful piano pieces ever written, so it will definitely be worth the work.



and all that jazz,
Bri
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rhapsody in orange
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« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2005, 09:34:42 AM »

Quote
The sixteenth notes in groupes of four (two measures before the end) how on earth can they be brought up to speed without the fingers falling over the place.  I supposed you're going to say, slow.slow. at first and gradually work up to speed....it seems this takes forever.  Any suggestions

Try it a with a bit of rubato? Stretching the time a bit might make it sound better than having wrong notes =)
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when words fail, music speaks
tonedeaf
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« Reply #7 on: June 03, 2005, 08:26:22 AM »

I would love to thank thierry13 for the wonderful advice. I can play the song with wrong notes here and there, and towards the end... it sounds horrible.. But at least it sounds like Nocturne Op 9-2... So I'm very happy. Thierry13's advice of learning the scales and appegios first really helped a lot. Thanks.

And thanks to other ppl whom helped me out with this piece. And I really appreciate you guy's advice... Smiley

Once again... Thanks.. Smiley
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