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Author Topic: liszt works  (Read 13101 times)
paris
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« on: March 22, 2005, 09:43:39 PM »

please if you could list some liszt works, what would you recomend to 16 year old student
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TheHammer
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« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2005, 10:49:58 PM »

Well, might I suggest that you give us at least the current grade of your student, since the fact that he is 16 year old gives no further information about his level of technique and musical develpoment.

Anyway, I remember this one thread.

http://pianoforum.net/smf/index.php/topic,4094.msg38101.html#msg38101
(especially reply#6, bernhards list of easy liszt pieces)

And someone posted a list of many many pieces graded and stuff, here are the liszt ones.
grades        piece
6      Abschied S. 251
8      Bagatelle without Tonality S. 216a
5      Consolations, S. 172 no. 1
6      Consolations, S. 172 no. 2
6      Consolations, S. 172 no. 3
6      Consolations, S. 172 no. 4
7      Consolations, S. 172 no. 5
7      Consolations, S. 172 no. 6
8      Eglogue: no 7 from ‘Années de Pèlerinage: 1ère Année, Suisse’, S 160
5      Etude Op. 1 No. 4
5      Five Hungarian Folk Songs S. 245
5              Five piano pieces S. 192
6      No 1 of ‘Four Short Piano Pieces’, S 192
7      No 2 of 'Five Hungarian Folksongs', S 245
5      Nuages gris  S. 199
5      Sancta Dorothea S. 187
5      The Christmas Tree S. 186
5      The Shephards at the Manger s. 186
8      Valse oubliée (no 1 in A minor, S 215/1)
8      Valses Oubliees S. 215
5      Wiegenlied 174
7      Years of Pilgrimage: 1yr Switzerland No. 2
7      Years of Pilgrimage: 2yr Italy No. 2
7      Years of Pilgrimage: 2yr Italy No. 3

hope this helped for the moment, but you will get much more detailed and better answers with more detailed (and yet simple) questions.  Wink
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paris
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« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2005, 10:22:18 PM »

Well, might I suggest that you give us at least the current grade of your student, since the fact that he is 16 year old gives no further information about his level of technique and musical develpoment.



i'm a student. i have been playing since i was 4.  i'm 3rd grade high school, if that means something (we have different system grading)
i read works you mentioned, but i'm not on level op.1 n.4  (for example)
currently i play more difficult pieces. i have experience with chopin etudes, and now i'm doing beethoven op.7.   and rachmaninoff Es-dur op.33 etude

today i heard a piece called  fantasia quasi sonata, apres lecture du Dante (something like that) can you tell me more about it, would be that too hard for me (it is 13 minutes long) What about hungarian rhapsodies or other pieces?     i know i'm asking much, but i appreciate every advice.
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pianowelsh
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« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2005, 12:42:59 PM »

whose the 16 year old? Maybe Liszt Spanish rhapsody, Hungarian Rhapsody no 12, the petrac sonnets, Dante or Napoli et Venezia?
I would seriously recommend investing in the books of the years of pilgrimage. The italian book has some fab pieces and the suises book actually - quite a wide difficulty range - a good investment!
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steinwayguy
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« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2005, 06:38:54 AM »

Mephisto or the Dante sonata!

Or maybe the transcendental etudes (all 12, duh  Shocked)
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TheHammer
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« Reply #5 on: March 25, 2005, 06:16:36 PM »

Well, first of all, sorry for the misunderstanding, since you were posting in the teaching board, I thought you were a teacher... by the way, do you have one? Liszt seems to be new terrain for you, so a teacher is strongly needed.

Now, you say you play op.7 and Chopin and Rach etudes, that is pretty advanced stuff, so in general, you could try to tackle most of Liszt pieces (besides thefreakin hard ones). Now, you will have to learn some new techniques, hmmm...

I think Consolations will bore you, you want some real Liszt, so Années de Pelerinage is a cool book. You will find the Dante sonata in "Year 2", but even though SteinwayGuy recommended it, I cannot believe he was serious. That isn't a good starting piece at all, neither are the Mephisto Waltz or the TE (shame on you SteinwayGuy!). On the other hand, is there any real easy piece by Liszt?
what I would recommend are the Paganini Etudes, e.g. the Campanella, no. 5 or no. 6(it's based on the famous Paganini caprice), but actually all are pretty cool, and certainly not as difficult as the others mentioned (but still very difficult)- if you want Hungarian Rhapsodies try no.6, a very famous one, not overwhelmingly difficult if you have not too much trouble with octave passages. And it's not so long.
Well, since I don`t know what your exact technical level is, you should not see my recommendations as something definite (as you see with the example of SteinwayGuy, some people tend to fool around a bit, beware of the fools!). Sightread  through the pieces, listen to them, read this forum and consult your teacher (if you have not one, get one!).

Best luck
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paris
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« Reply #6 on: March 25, 2005, 06:40:28 PM »

by the way, do you have one? Liszt seems to be new terrain for you, so a teacher is strongly needed.

i have teacher since i was 4 (since i've started) , so that's not doubtful.   in fact, liszt is not a new territory to me, actually i did some works. i played etude op.1 n.2,4    and i have started la campanella (thrills are killing me Grin ) of course, i haven't mastered it. yet.
anyway, my opinion is that i can manage with dante, with much much practising.  i just wanted to hear from you who have more experience then i.   all advices and thoughts are welcome. especially bernhards  Wink
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steinwayguy
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« Reply #7 on: March 26, 2005, 05:33:09 AM »

I know tons of 16-year olds who play the Mephisto Waltz. As long as you're experienced and motivated, you can play it, for sure.
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smj9195
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« Reply #8 on: February 10, 2010, 08:59:27 AM »

All of Liszt's works are 8 or 8plus!
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anote1532
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« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2012, 07:34:20 AM »

8+ Tongue
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pianoplayjl
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« Reply #10 on: January 04, 2012, 02:34:18 AM »

All of Liszt's works are 8 or 8plus!

No. Rather, 'Most of Liszt's works are 8 or 8 plus.' You must also look at his consolations too, his Romance, klavierstucke, Tocatta, etudes op1 (not as in TE) etc. Not alot of pieces are easy.

JL
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