Piano Forum



Rhapsody in Blue – A Piece of American History at 100!
The centennial celebration of George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue has taken place with a bang and noise around the world. The renowned work of American classical music has become synonymous with the jazz age in America over the past century. Piano Street provides a quick overview of the acclaimed composition, including recommended performances and additional resources for reading and listening from global media outlets and radio. Read more >>

Topic: elvira madigan  (Read 1440 times)

Offline pianonut

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1618
elvira madigan
on: March 29, 2005, 01:57:49 AM
did you know that mozart's piano concerto K 467 was named in the late sixties!  i always wondered why the name elvira.  well, now you know the rest of the story.  it was named because its exquisite slow second movement was used to great effect in a swedish film of that name in the late sixties.

ok i am reading a book about mozart. it's really great. it's called 'what to listen for in mozart' by robert harris.  next week, we're learning about oratorios (much less interesting than piano concertos, imo).  i want three more weeks on concertos.  i hope i can take the concerto class in the fall.  this is what i was born to do.  even if it is just to look at the music and sigh.
do you know why benches fall apart?  it is because they have lids with little tiny hinges so you can store music inside them.  hint:  buy a bench that does not hinge.  buy it for sturdiness.

Offline pianonut

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1618
Re: elvira madigan
Reply #1 on: March 29, 2005, 02:08:50 AM
ps one last note--" mozart repeated himself far less than almost any other composer...a technique used in one piano concerto will be abandoned in the next, although they might have been composed less than two weeks apart.  in the K 467 he decided to see how many different musical ideas he could integrate into his movement; more so than in most of his concertos, there is a wealth of melodic material here."
do you know why benches fall apart?  it is because they have lids with little tiny hinges so you can store music inside them.  hint:  buy a bench that does not hinge.  buy it for sturdiness.

Offline pianonut

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1618
Re: elvira madigan
Reply #2 on: March 29, 2005, 03:03:44 AM
if you are like me, and know nothing about elvira madigan, the tightrope walker who deserted the circus for an army man, here's your chance:

www.abraxaspress.co.uk/N_elvira.htm#fn1

a very sad story.
do you know why benches fall apart?  it is because they have lids with little tiny hinges so you can store music inside them.  hint:  buy a bench that does not hinge.  buy it for sturdiness.
 

Logo light pianostreet.com - the website for classical pianists, piano teachers, students and piano music enthusiasts.

Subscribe for unlimited access

Sign up

Follow us

Piano Street Digicert