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Chopin - Nocturne in Eb Op. 9 No. 2 - How long did it take for YOU to learn it? (Read 22290 times)

Offline j0no

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Like the topic says. To you who has played this piece: How long did it take to learn it?

And which is the best method of learning it in your opinon? For the moment I work with one bar at a time using HT.

piano sheet music of Nocturne


Offline hodi

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i'm joining the question but i'm asking the same about the fantasie impromptu.. do u think in 3 months this piece can be done for performance?

CLV391

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depends, of course. many could do it in a day

i did it when i had onlt taken lessons for 2.5 (at 17) years and learned it in about 5 weeks (amongst other pieces)

Offline j0no

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depends, of course. many could do it in a day

i did it when i had onlt taken lessons for 2.5 (at 17) years and learned it in about 5 weeks (amongst other pieces)

the nocturne or impromptu?

Offline nanabush

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Probably the Nocturne, I can't see anyone learning the Fantaisie Impromptu up to par for performance in one day....  The nocturne is not long at all, but it is quite difficult especially for the left hand..
Interested in discussing:

-Prokofiev Toccata
-Scriabin Sonata 2

Offline freddychopin

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I did Op. 9 no. 1 & 2 in about 2 months. No. 3 is a complete different story ;D I'm still improving it (since 2 year ago). I have never played the Impromptu because it is already overplayed so why me?

Offline dinosaurtales

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It all depends on what you mean by "learn".  It's sort of like saying "I learned to ski last weekend". 

I learned to play through the thing, notes and basic dynamics in a couple of weeks. But I worked on it amongst other things for several more months to figure out how I wanted the various phrasings to go, and to get it smooth.  These nocturnes reuqire "offline" thought, and some work, and re-work, to see how you think you can make the most of the little melody.  Sounds simple enough, but they are all actually quite difficult to feel like you've mastered one - at least that's what it's like for me. 

If somebody assigned me op9 no 2 to perform in 2 months I could no doubt do it.  But six months later I would have a much better version ready - guaranteed!
So much music, so little time........

Offline steinwayguy

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Offline nathan-fr

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For my part, it takes maybe 2-3 days to learn the piece, but maybe a week or two to get the touch I want for interpretation. It's not a such difficult piece ; like often in Chopin start by learning well the left hand and separatly feel the music phrase at the RH, which is quite simple. When LH play without hesitation, it's done. It's a really beautiful Nocturne, but I prefer op 27 (1 and 2).
For the Fantasie-Impromptu, it's a little more difficult. I need a good month to have it in my finger. Study the 8/6 on Brahms Etudes or for more fun in "l'Aquarium" from the "Carnaval des animaux" of Saint Saens. Very sympathic and when you get the rythm thing, you can work the Improptu from slow to fast with both hands. Try to be the more precise possible, even if you not play very fast at the first time.
Have fun.

Offline Derek

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It took me several months to learn it well enough not to pause or make weird mistakes. Its still not perfect. But do I care that others learn it faster? Not a whit.

Offline BuyBuy

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I remember learning it as a student in my 6th year (in Spain, where the grades are different from the British grading). I think it took me about two weeks to learn the notes decently, and probably two more weeks to get it up to performance level (interpretation, cleaning a couple of messy spots like those fast RH notes at the end).

I think it was the easiest piece I played that year. It's probably on the bottom three for difficulty among Chopin nocturnes, so... Fantaisie Impromptu, though, is a whole different story. I haven't learned it, but I'm sure it would take many weeks to get it half decent. The level is way different : gotta have very flexible fingers for the fast notes, gotta have a good brain to split LH and RH rythms, and stamina to play up to speed to the end. I definitely would go for the Nocturne, and after a couple of years of lessons, do the Impromptu.

Offline Mozartian

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About a month, but allow more time to get your interpretation right.
[lau] 10:01 pm: like in 10/4 i think those little slurs everywhere are pointless for the music, but I understand if it was for improving technique

Offline quantum

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The Nocturne - maybe 2 weeks
The Impromptu - maybe 6 weeks.

It's been so long that I don't even remember.   

I don't play the nocturne than often, but it takes a great deal of though towards interpretation.  There are very many good posibilities, and my playing of it would change from day to day. 

The impromptu:  my interpretation is still further being refined.  There is a lot more to discover in this piece, besides it's virtuosic nature. 
Made a Liszt. Need new Handel's for Soler panel & Alkan foil. Will Faure Stein on the way to pick up Mendels' sohn. Josquin get Wolfgangs Schu with Clara. Gone Chopin, I'll be Bach

Offline robert

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Nothing remarkable about me regarding this Nocturne but a friend of mine did something very impressing. He learnt it by heart and could play it rather well before he turned 8 years old. That was back in the 60:ths.
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