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Topic: master a piece  (Read 1163 times)

Offline daomingsi

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master a piece
on: May 06, 2005, 12:29:12 PM
how to really master a piece ? other than keep practice and practice section by section .i find that i still cant really master

Offline xvimbi

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Re: master a piece
Reply #1 on: May 06, 2005, 01:11:24 PM
From your short post, it is difficult to give good advice. For starters, try to define where the problem is. Can't you remember the piece anymore after a short while? Do you forget what the correct motions are to get through a difficult section?

In any case, whatever the problem might be, the reason is most likely that you don't know the piece well enough (at least that is the case with me, when I have similar problems.) Try putting more effort in analyzing and understanding all aspects of the piece (structure, harmony, chord progressions, key changes, etc.) The more you know about a piece, the easier it is to keep it in good working conditions. Play through those pieces whenever you can. You don't need a piano to do that; you can do this in your head wherever and whenever (look for "mental practice").

Also, there is nothing wrong with forgetting pieces and relearning them. It appears that once you have thoroughly forgotten a piece and relearned it two or three times from stratch, it will stick forever. I don't have a lot of personal experience with this concept, yet. I tried it only with two little pieces, and so far it seems to be working.

Again, really knowing the music is the key (IMO)

Offline i_m_robot

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Re: master a piece
Reply #2 on: May 06, 2005, 01:18:05 PM
There seem to be some pieces that just wont stick no matter how hard you practice

this has nothing to do with difficulty but rather the mental effort put into a piece

if one attempt to repeat section almost mechanically until they are ingrained one will surely be disappointed with the results regardless of how many hours one puts into practice

however, attempting practice with ones mind yields far better results

instead of taking the repeat over and over until you stop thinking about it route try instead to see hear and feel each movement before the note is pressed before each and every note

pretty soon you will be painting pictures with your mind and not just regurgitating ingrained movements

 ;D how was that?
WATASHI NO NAMAE WA

AI EMU ROBATO DESU

立派のエビの苦闘及びは立派である

Offline daomingsi

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Re: master a piece
Reply #3 on: May 06, 2005, 01:19:29 PM
From your short post, it is difficult to give good advice. For starters, try to define where the problem is. Can't you remember the piece anymore after a short while? Do you forget what the correct motions are to get through a difficult section?

In any case, whatever the problem might be, the reason is most likely that you don't know the piece well enough (at least that is the case with me, when I have similar problems.) Try putting more effort in analyzing and understanding all aspects of the piece (structure, harmony, chord progressions, key changes, etc.) The more you know about a piece, the easier it is to keep it in good working conditions. Play through those pieces whenever you can. You don't need a piano to do that; you can do this in your head wherever and whenever (look for "mental practice").

Also, there is nothing wrong with forgetting pieces and relearning them. It appears that once you have thoroughly forgotten a piece and relearned it two or three times from stratch, it will stick forever. I don't have a lot of personal experience with this concept, yet. I tried it only with two little pieces, and so far it seems to be working.

Again, really knowing the music is the key (IMO)

i dun really can feel e music and e melody is nt fluent enough and my exam is coming soon i scare i might not able to catch up anyway wat u mean by mental practice

Offline xvimbi

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Re: master a piece
Reply #4 on: May 06, 2005, 01:56:02 PM
i dun really can feel e music and e melody is nt fluent enough and my exam is coming soon i scare i might not able to catch up anyway wat u mean by mental practice

Mental practice means to play the piece in your mind, going through the full motions even, but imagining the motions should suffice. If you can play a piece in your mind, hands together, at full speed, imagining the sounds, then you really know your piece.

Check the following for a start (there are further links in these threads):

https://www.pianoforum.net/smf/index.php/topic,8491.0.html
https://www.pianoforum.net/smf/index.php/topic,8650.0.html
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