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Topic: Looking for some feedback  (Read 1464 times)

Offline andrew_close

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Looking for some feedback
on: June 02, 2005, 10:33:17 PM
Hi.

I don't post here often, but without a teacher, I'm a little concerned that i may be developing technical flaws that will hinder any further progress.
Here's a video of me playing an abridged version of Ravel's 'Jeux d'eau'.
I would be most grateful if any experienced players could spot any flaws in my posture(including seat height, distance from instrument) or techniquie, and perhaps point me in ways to fix this.
The piano used is digital, so im really just looking for any technical advice/ pointers on my playing, as tone production on such an instrument is futile.

https://homepage.ntlworld.com/andrew.close/jeuxdeau3.wmv

Thanks for any help
Andrew.



Making noise since 1980

www.andrewclose.co.uk

Offline lostinidlewonder

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Re: Looking for some feedback
Reply #1 on: June 03, 2005, 12:38:23 AM
Looked pretty good technically, although the video quality isn't the best so there is limitation as to what you can exactly see going on at the keys.

I like the use of the rubato at the start, making a little more elastic the ending of the phrase. Eg: Bar 2 Rh the 2 group of semiquavers. Then kicking it back to tempo the following bar immediantly.

I personally feel it is overused if you do it again in Bar 4 + Bar 8, I feel that you should move immediantly to the next phrase without holding back the tempo. This probably what made Bars 9-10 seem a little rushed and detached from the music to me rather than maintaining the flow.

Bars 13-14 the Rh has to really draw more out of the top note of the arpeggio.

Bar 15 When the Lh strikes the C# G# chord Rh has to come in earlier, and you also broadened the first 2 notes struck in the Rh. I am not sure if that mutates the effect or not, examination wise they would probably mark down on it because it demonstrates you are not controlling the flow and are using a pause to moving inbetween different forms to compensate for it.

Bar 19-20 is too loud.

Bar21: The cresendo needs to be a lot more growing in sound with the climax of sound when the Rh plays the F#,D#,C# then dies off. I think this is real important.

Bar22: Then this has been dropped down in volume from the decresendo previously, you are playing it at the same volume as previous in this recording.

Bar 23: Need to work out the long cresendo.

Bar 24: Immediantly quieter and softness in sound needs to be evident here. Much more... mysterious warm sound. Careful not to rise in sound the first time you play the Rh melody, it is the second time where you grow in sound and demonstrate that difference.

Bar 27-28: The first group of notes at the beginning of the rit mark in Bar 28 are missing.

Bar29-30 I see you chose to cross the hands as the score suggests, but you can also do the other way as well.

Bar35 onward section: The Rh has to again draw out the top melodic notes of the arpeggios more.

When you move from Bar 35-36 it sounded a little rushed. In Bar 35 When Rh plays the last 2 groups of demisemiquavers E#C## A# E#    C## A# E# A#.

The Ending arpeggios of the Rh need to be gentler, I dont know if it is the electric piano or not, if so make the Lh louder at least to compensate.
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Offline allthumbs

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Re: Looking for some feedback
Reply #2 on: June 08, 2005, 08:52:13 PM
Greetings :)

I agree completely with lostinidlewonder (if that's his real name). What did he say? ;)
hahaha.

Actually, all joking aside, it's great that members take the time to write such detailed answers to questions/requests posed.

Now I'm interested in learning the piece so I can understand and use the advice given.

Cheers ;D

Sauter Delta (185cm) polished ebony 'Lucy'
Serial # 118 562

Offline ludwig

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Re: Looking for some feedback
Reply #3 on: June 08, 2005, 11:29:12 PM
Hey Andrew, by the looks of the finger work I'd say its pretty relaxed and good, are you tense however in your arms and shoulders when you play though? I mean your shoulders look a littl lifted and the arms don't out that much from your body...
"Classical music snobs are some of the snobbiest snobs of all. Often their snobbery masquerades as helpfulnes... unaware that they are making you feel small in order to make themselves feel big..."ÜÜÜ

Offline lostinidlewonder

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Re: Looking for some feedback
Reply #4 on: June 11, 2005, 08:37:41 AM
lostinidlewonder (if that's his real name).

Yeah it's Beautiful and is my rEal name. My pareNts hated me. :(
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Offline andrew_close

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Re: Looking for some feedback
Reply #5 on: June 26, 2005, 02:40:47 PM
Thanks for the feedback.

Ludwig - you mention my shoulders seeming tense. I think this is a problem, and i can relax them if i conciously make an effort to. However, it's never long before they're touching my ears again without my noticing the tension return.
Any know of any techniques to relieve tension on a more permanent basis?

Thanks again
Andrew
Making noise since 1980

www.andrewclose.co.uk

Offline ludwig

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Re: Looking for some feedback
Reply #6 on: June 27, 2005, 02:52:16 AM
Andrew, I think the only way to concur this lifting is to be conciously aware of it and relax them whenever you notice them rising... over time it will dissapear. What is the nature of you lifting and tensing your shoulders? Is it for like musical purpose? like you feel that there's a need to do so to create some musical effects? Is it when there's a harder and more lush passage in the music? so you feel the need for a bit of tension? Or is it just a habit? Do you have an adjustable stool? Have you tried sitting just a little lower? So you have to move your arms a bit more and concerntrate on fingerwork? I think we don't use our fingers enough, we can create so much more varied tone colours and effects just with the way we use our hands and fingers, (same with the arms)...so its not really necessary to move the shoulders up, also, you could move your body a little bit more maybe? Instead of keeping a really stiff back when playing, if it helps you relax your shoulders a bit more...

I guess you can figure out why you tense your shoulders from your video recordings, I had a look again at the video and noticed how you were relaxed at certain places in the music (like around 2.30) and when you had arpeggiated, louder and more busy bits, you were tense... This could be you are worried about those bits so you tense up, or because you feel musically you can create a more dramatic sound with the lifting of the shoulders? I don't know, recording yourself is a great way to examine your playing, you are not thinking and worried about playing the music, you are assessing yourself from a more objective point and you can be critical :)

"Classical music snobs are some of the snobbiest snobs of all. Often their snobbery masquerades as helpfulnes... unaware that they are making you feel small in order to make themselves feel big..."ÜÜÜ

Offline ajw400

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Re: Looking for some feedback
Reply #7 on: June 27, 2005, 06:36:40 AM
One thing I might add (and I agree with what's been said already, btw) - I think that your posture could have more alignment in the spine. I think this is terrifically important in preventing tendinitis....etc. You just need to feel the base of your skull moving away from the base of your spine and your entire inner core lifting up while engaging your ab muscles slightly to avoid splaying your chest open unnaturally. Once the core of your torso is strong and free from tension, your shoulders will just hang there and move away from your spine and you won't have any tension. One technique for improving posture is to experiment in making the biggest sound possible in chordal writing without becoming harsh. To make a truly huge sound, you absolutely need to have your back in line so the impulse from the small of your back can be amplified into the keys without tension. Generally though, you play very well - keep it up.
 

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